Free

Philosophical debates - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
In the past, acts of terrorism—which can be defined as attacks on civilian targets rather than military targets—were often committed as part of a campaign of…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER95.7% of users find it useful
Philosophical debates
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Philosophical debates"

Terrorism in the 21st century is very different than terrorism in the time of John Locke or Edmund Burke. In the past, acts of terrorism—which can bedefined as attacks on civilian targets rather than military targets—were often committed as part of a campaign of independence or to achieve a nationalist goal. They were often geographically limited and did not cause large-scale civilian casualties. Today, terrorism is a global threat motivated by a very different ideology and is much more deadly. Burke would be appalled by this development and would probably support American and government action against terrorists; Locke would probably be appalled by Guantanamo Bay and some of the extremes committed by the Bush Administration after 9/11 such as enhanced interrogation techniques. Both philosophers, however, were very clever men who would be able to cogently argue both positions of the argument.
A good example of 18th century terrorism was the French Revolution, which had the aim of overthrowing the aristocracy and declaring the independence of the other classes. The event was historically very significant and caused huge political ripples at the time. This was one of the first times Republicanism had reared its head on the European continent. Burke strongly opposed the Revolution, believing that violent revolution was not acceptable and would in the end change nothing. It is important to note that these Revolutionaries did not attack London or Washington, and they weren’t interested in Spain. Their campaign was focused and motivated by achievable goals. The terrorism of today is different. The mujahideen in Afghanistan come from all over the Islamic world. Some want to take control of the elected Afghan government, but others want to set up bases in Afghanistan to wage a global jihad against the West under the tutelage of Al Qaeda. They tend to view all Westerners as enemies. Terrorism is now a global phenomenon motivated by a distorted global ideology. Burke would hate terrorism in all its form and support countries that wished to do something about it. Any drastic change is bad, Burke wrote, especially changes that are achieved through violence and with the intention to create a utopia or an idealistic world.
Locke would probably try to understand the terrorists and argue that colonial powers, such as the U.S., broke a social contract with the poorer people of the world, and that terrorism is a consequence. He would not be a believer in the notion of a clash of civilizations, believing at heart that most people share the same values and that most disputes and conflicts are illusory. He would urge tolerance of these different political ideas and be appalled at enhanced interrogation techniques. Respect is a keyword for Locke and his followers. Since he was a big believer in the separation of the branches of government, it’s unlikely he would be much of a fan of Dick Cheney who tried to dramatically increase the power of the Executive Branch of the U.S. during the war on terror. He would have a very different opinion of the War on Terror than Burke.
Sources
F. P. Lock. (1985). Burkes Reflections on the Revolution in France. London: George Allen & Unwin.
Steven Blakemore, ed. (1992), Burke and the French Revolution. Bicentennial Essays (The University of Georgia Press.
Moseley, Alexander (2007). John Locke: Continuum Library of Educational Thought. Continuum.
Rousseau, George S. (2004). Nervous Acts: Essays on Literature, Culture and Sensibility. Palgrave Macmillan. Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Philosophical debates Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1560384-philosophical-debates
(Philosophical Debates Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words)
https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1560384-philosophical-debates.
“Philosophical Debates Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1560384-philosophical-debates.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Philosophical debates

Philosophical Thought

...Philosophical Thought 22 July Final Paper for Philosophical Thought In the discussion of the studied module for this course, there lies the concept between the saint and the hero, two kinds of archetypes that represent the best qualities of the human spirit from different spectrums. The saint is the archetype that focuses on the spiritual well-being of an individual in light of the divine and the universe, while the hero portrays the qualities found best in human endeavors and efforts. In my opinion, I believe that the value of human existence is best found in balancing the saint and hero qualities, putting them in harmony with each other. While explaining my position, discussion will be made with regard...
8 Pages(2000 words)Thesis

Philosophical Reconstruction

...? 28 April Argument Reconstruction of Descartes’ Meditations (Second Meditation) The Second Meditation of Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy: Concerning the Nature of Human Mind: That is Better Known than the Body, is rather testing and complicated, and sometimes it is not "trouble-free" to follow what he intends to carry out. While Descartes' claim is not solely and completely clear-cut and well-defined - he does not openly create the relationships that I will formulate, instead, indirectly draws attention to those relationships – the claim is adept of reconstruction. Firstly, observe that Descartes presents two leading issues in the second meditation: (1) the cognito (the idea on thinking); (2) the wax argument... 28 April Argument...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Philosophical reasoning

.... In which case, it is difficult for the reader to entirely comprehend which side of the debate Beauvoir stands. The objectivity of Beauvoir as a philosophical writer is a strength as seen in her argumentative reasoning structure. Beauvoir and Sommers, using the philosophical systematic method, ask a series of questions that elicit reflections which produce responses from themselves. They continue in the tradition of feminist debate in their works, "The Second Sex" and "Who Stole Feminism" Each philosophical writer has their own way of examining reality; one by structure of topics, the other by specific examples. Both writers use argumentative...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Presidential Debates

...Analysis of the 2008 Presidential Debates Political debates are an excellent way to practice the use of dis analysis. They offer a great many examples of the different ways in which spoken word can be manipulated toward a meaning different than the words alone would normally imply (Chilton). It also gives the observer a glimpse into the inner workings and deeper motives of the speaker as the analysis assists in uncovering hidden meanings revealed through context, emotion, gestures, and intonation among other things (Wodak). Discourse analysis can also help the observer to better understand the power struggle that can take place between two competitors, especially those warring in an arena of words, such...
18 Pages(4500 words)Book Report/Review

Abortion Debates

...s Teacher’s 12th October’ Abortion Debates Abortion is one of the most discordant issues of every society. Be it the east or the west, this topic has always trounced all other issues of discussions and has been the cause of innumerable debates. Abortion, according to one type of people is considered to be the most depraved and unethical practices done by the women who opt for it and the people who help them do so. This is because human life should be valued and respected and nature does not allow the act to harm or terminate the life of anyone. Abortion damages a new soul that is about to be a part of the word and destruction of a new soul means murder. Moreover, there are lots of other health...
1 Pages(250 words)Thesis

Debates

...The Presidential Debate on Foreign Policy 0 Introduction The United s has gone another election period, whereby Obama has taken another term of office. This paper utters about the recent presidential debate, detailing the differences and commonalities of perspectives between the presidential candidates. 2.0 Distinguished Differences and Commonalities Romney utters that the principal element of the US foreign policy is for the Muslims to reject extremism. The US can develop this by economic improvement, annihilate gender inequality and develop the rule of law. He added that Russia is a geopolitical enemy. Moreover, Syria must be penetrated through inculcating strong leadership because the country is a...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

The development of the discipline of nursing has gone through many stages of philosophical debates. Justify the relevance and utility of the knowledge of theory development to your practice

...Development of the nursing discipline due: Nursing knowledge is based on philosophical problems that arise with the nursing science. Nursing can be drawn from theory and other disciplines therefore closing in on the gap between theory and practice. The rationalistic view propagated by Descartes and Spinoza in the 1600’s viewed nursing as superior knowledge through deduction and mathematics. Bacon (1600) and Immanuel Kant (1700) viewed nursing from an experimental and knowledge based arguments respectively. According to Levine 1995, theory in the early days was perceived to be obscure. If one solved or understood a theory then it was no longer considered a theory. Theories were meant to confuse and offer no practical value...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

Philosophical Ethics

...Module Philosophical Ethics Immigration is one of controversial ethical issues facing the US in the modern world. A high number of immigrants move into the US every year. These immigrants move into the country either legally or illegally. What is clear is that these citizens are escaping from some sort of political or religious oppression (Ferrell and John 29). However, most of these individuals move into the US in search of a better life that is commonly known as the ‘American Dream’. The bone of contention is that when the illegal immigrants move into the US they take up jobs, receive health care and welfare funds that mainly come from the taxes that are paid by the American citizens. Illegal immigration is a divisive...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Philosophical Questions

...Accordino, of Arguments that God exists 4. Does God exist? There are many questions that the humanity has been discussing for a considerable amount of it. While some of those issues might or might not be directly relevant to life, there is one universal question that has divided the mankind into two opposing groups: does God exist? It would not be a mistake to suggest that if any person provided at least some kind of evidence that would prove the divine existence to science that would change the whole history of the human civilization. However, as of now there are only three options available for the people who try to answer it: reject the existence of God; adopt some spiritual tradition and believe in dogma or utilize philosophy... of...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Western Philosophical View v. Eastern Philosophical View

...Western Philosophical View versus Eastern Philosophical View One of the fundamental differences between Christianity and Buddhist is that while the former is centered on the religious teachings of Gatuama, the latter is centered on the teachings and life of Jesus Christ. Likewise, Buddhism can be described as being non-theistic because there is no believe in a supreme creator. On the contrary, Christianity is a monotheistic religion that believes in the supreme creator of the universe, who is also the father of Jesus Christ. Buddhism seems to be an offshoot religion of Hinduism while Christianity draws its teachings and beliefs from the Abrahamic religion and Judaism. The two religions are, however,...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Philosophical debates for FREE!

Contact Us