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In patients with central venous catheter, does the subclavian vein site is better as comparing with jugular or femoral sites in reducing catheter related blood stream infection - Research Paper Example

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It is motivating to make an observation on this particular issue because while there may be guidelines and new products (alcohol-based hand…
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In patients with central venous catheter, does the subclavian vein site is better as comparing with jugular or femoral sites in reducing catheter related blood stream infection
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Hand Hygiene Compliance in Health Care Workers Innovation is the introduction of something new in order to make changes or modifications (Chambers Paperback Dictionary, 1999).
As such, the hand hygiene compliance in health care workers is vital to the reduction of infection within any kind of health care setting. It is motivating to make an observation on this particular issue because while there may be guidelines and new products (alcohol-based hand rubs/ABHRs) to effect such practices in clinics and hospitals; professional health care workers are said to be the common starting point of nosocomial infections that abound within the actual health care situation because most of them do not conform with proper sanitation, degerming and hand washing.
Hand sanitation, as per research and studies, confirms a decrease of pathogenic agents that propagates nosocomial infections and complications in patients who are confined in hospitals (Elridge et al 2006). The fundamental conclusion that arises from relevant hospital acquired infection researches as issued by the CDC were: “1) the hands of health care workers are regularly contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms; and “2) the hands of health care workers are a major route of transmission of pathogens throughout the hospital environment and from the body of one patient to another (Elridge et al 2006).”
Thus, it is recommended by the 2002 CDC Guideline that alcohol-based hand rubs or ABHRs are more effective to use in dispensing pathogenic microbes; and are quicker to use than the traditional soap and water without the usual side effect of having dermatitis (Elridge et al 2006).
The understanding of the health care staff workers especially in critical units of the hospital like the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), with regards to the essence of hand hygiene practice is significant as this is the best or one of the best ways to manage and avert contaminations which are normally present and related to health care (Cohen et al 2003). It must be clearly understood that newborns within the said unit can contract high degree of infections due to their very delicate immune system, which are not yet highly developed (Cohen et al 2003). The common transmission for the infection occurs after hand contact is established with “environmental surfaces and patient equipment” or the removal of gloves that generally happens prior to the performance of invasive procedures (Cohen et al 2003).
In relation to the above circumstance, a guideline has been given out by the CDC on how proper hand washing should be done prior to any hands-on contact with patients that are critically ill or otherwise. But while the CDC Hand Hygiene Guideline has been mandated; and concerned hospitals may have amended their written policies or regulations on the guideline of hand washing and proper sanitation that includes the provision of recommended hand hygiene products (ABHRs), it turned out that the compliance has remained quite low due to the presence of many aspects that affect thorough conformity with the issued guideline. This indicates that open support from the hospital management and administration is necessary for the hand hygiene recommendations to become very effective (Larson et al 2007).
Therefore, strong administrative support coupled with the proper adoption of newer alcohol-based products (ABHRs) has the probability of making hand hygiene sanitation performance more successful (Cohen et al 2003). It is also imperative that follow-throughs are done regularly to ensure that appropriate hand sanitation is being complied with since the health and recovery of the patients rests in the hands of the health care workers.
References
Chambers Paperback Dictionary. (1999). Innovate (p. 287). Chambers Harrap Publishers LTD, Edinburgh.
Cohen, Bevin, Saiman, Lisa, Cimiotti, Jeannie and Larson, Elaine. (2003). Author Manuscript: Factors Associated with Hand Hygiene Practices in Two Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Retrieved on October 21, 2009 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1995808/
Elridge, Noel, Woods, Susan, Bonello, Robert, Clutter, Kay, Ellingson, LeAnn, Harris, Mary Ann, Livingston, Barbara, Bagian, James, Danko, Linda, Dunn, Edward, Parlier, Renee, Pederson, Cheryl, Reichling, Kim, Roselle, Gary and Wright, Steven. (2006). Using the Six Sigma Process to Implement the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for Hand Hygiene in 4 Intensive Care Units. Retrieved on October 21, 2009 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2557134/
Larson, Elaine, Quiros, Dave, and Lin, Susan. (2007). Dissemination of the CDC’s Hand Hygiene Guideline and Impact on Infection Rates. Retrieved on October 21, 2009 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2137889/ Read More
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