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How did abolitionism, women's movement rights, and immigration change the nations of the Western Hemisphere - Essay Example

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The United States constitution always had an idea of outlawing slavery before the amendment was adopted. "Freedom was regarded as a local prejudice, slavery as the ward of the Nation, the jewel of the Constitution". More 75 years, the U.S. used their legal cleverness in guarding, protecting and fostering slavery, and because of this an outrage occurred- words were twisted and stretched to something totally off subject…
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How did abolitionism, womens movement rights, and immigration change the nations of the Western Hemisphere
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How did abolitionism, women's movement rights, and immigration change the nations of the Western Hemisphere
Abolitionism (13th Amendment)
The United States constitution always had an idea of outlawing slavery before the amendment was adopted. "Freedom was regarded as a local prejudice, slavery as the ward of the Nation, the jewel of the Constitution". More 75 years, the U.S. used their legal cleverness in guarding, protecting and fostering slavery, and because of this an outrage occurred- words were twisted and stretched to something totally off subject. As soon as the 13th amendment was legal, the slaves were free; people stopped differentiating between colored and white people. The colored people were as good as the whites, they became citizens and were considered 'the people of the US' and they got a constitutional guarantee of a republican government. (http://www.infidels.org/library/historical/robert_ingersoll/civil_rights.html)
The 13th Amendment built up for the country, after the amendment was adopted the slave pen at that time was destroyed and in its place they put the Statue of Liberty. The amendment wasn't just about freeing slaves, but more on the side of making equal rites for everyone, making colored and whites the same. The amendment caused the damage of every incriminating evidence of 'slaves', ignored the reports against freedom, took away the word 'white' and its meaning, and took away the right to own a man.
Women's Right Movement
Prior to the Civil War, the constitution didn't have specification for voting because laws weren't governed by the constitution or the federal law, but only a few of the northern states allowed the free 'colored' men to register and vote. But right after the War, congress adopted the Military Reconstruction Act of 1867, which let the confederate states be a part of the union under the condition of universal male suffrage.
The 14th Amendment, in 1868, gave citizenship to everyone born in the US, which in turn meant that only males could vote. Two years later, the 15th Amendment was adopted and it stated that race, color and 'previous condition of servitude' were not a base to deny the right of voting. Enforcement Act of 1870 penalized those who stood in the way of letting others votes, especially those states that didn't approve of blacks voting. This resulted in the fact that 'colored' citizens were the majority of the votes; the straight facts were that near for the first time in their lives, blacks could represent the state, local and federal offices and help their government.
Immigration
Religious pluralism was expanded in the 19th century, from the early 1800s to the early 1900's an estimate of 30 million people immigrated to the US, mostly from Germany, Italy, Ireland, Austria and Hungary. The American Catholic and Protestants tried to convert the immigrants to their religions through preaching, humanitarianism, and education. From Europe the Roman Catholics wanted priest that were of their own nationality and spoke their language, there for bringing along their saints and festivals that more often than not clashed with the American Catholics.
Orthodox Christians came from Greece, Russia, and the Balkans in large groups in towards the end of the 19th century. The Russian based in Alaska in 11794, but the immigration, later on, made "Orthodoxy a significant presence in most major North American cities". The ethnic identities, different languages, worship, and customs were very vast in the different churches and caused problems but eventually calmed down. (http://demo.lutherproductions.com/historytutor/basic/modern/stories/19-cent-migrate-na.htm)
Works Cited
Civil Rights
http://www.infidels.org/library/historical/robert_ingersoll/civil_rights.html Accessed June 27, 2006
Before The Voting Rights Act
http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/voting/intro/intro_a.htm Accessed June 27, 2006
19th-century immigration to North America http://demo.lutherproductions.com/historytutor/basic/modern/stories/19-cent-migrate-na.htm Accessed June 27, 2006 Read More
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