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Transmission of Medical Knowledge - Assignment Example

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The author of the "Transmission of Medical Knowledge" paper identifies the ways European practitioners responded to writings on medicine and explains why by Islamic authors and identifies whether Greek practitioners embraced and rejected Islamic Ideas on medicine. …
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Transmission of Medical Knowledge
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Download file to see previous pages The idea was introduced to Islamic culture by the Greek practitioners. At that time, Islamic medicine was based on Islamic culture while humoral medicine was based on the accepted theoretical framework by Greek medicine. Analyzing this situation, it can be clearly justified that Greeks considered their ideas on medicine superior to that of Islamic belief.

The idea of humoral medicine that time seemed to cover all the essentials about human medicine that the Islamic world did not hesitate to accept its underlying ideas and principles. In fact, to prove that the Islamic world embraced humoural medicine, several Greek texts about humoural medicine were converted into Arabic in the 11th century. The reasons for conversion were not so clear but somehow there were issues that came out related to political, social, and intellectual. Supposed these three were the truth behind the translation process, the intellectual aspect may be further differentiated so as to come up with some important arguments. If it was based on intellectual, then it is just simply saying that Islam practitioners adhered to the fact that the idea about humoural medicine must be superior from Islamic medicine which was based on Islamic culture and belief.

The best point of this is that in the 7th century it was not Islamic medicine which was translated into Greek words which only proved the fact that the Greek practitioners were not really that interested in Islamic medicines. In fact, the very truth about translation is to be able to apply exactly the idea of the text by putting it into actual practice. Greek medicine was a strong influence on Islamic medicine but not the other way around in the early part of the century.

The term “embrace” can be demonstrated equally as good as trying to translate an idea into something that can be understood. However, there was no account that the Islamic ideas on medicines were translated from its natural text into the Greek text. ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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