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Employee relations - Essay Example

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1) Describe the international and regulatory system as it affects the work place. Critically analyze if it has any impact. The international system regarding employee welfare and employee relations lacks coercive power and is not able to effectively regulate the conditions offered to employees in various countries…
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Employee relations
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Download file to see previous pages However, Third World countries are not able to implement this law effectively and child labor is heavily prevalent in such countries. The United Kingdom has set a proper regulatory system for employee-employer relations and aims to ensure that both sides receive their fair share. It is alleged at times that employees receive a greater amount of leniency and have more say than the employer has in the maintenance of this relationship. However, employees in the UK also have issues regarding the minimum wage, pension plans, and health benefits included in their pay (Lewis, pg. 114-184, 2003). Mainly, developed countries such as the UK, Australia, USA, and Canada have regulatory systems, which aim to moderate the relationship between employees and employers. Laws govern the contracts upheld by both parties and the clauses are testable by law. Hence, if one party fails to acknowledge or fulfill a clause mentioned in the contract, that party is liable to punishment by law. However, not all countries have a regulatory system. Most Third World Countries have neither a minimum wage nor an obligation to provide employees with any other benefits. Discrimination and unnecessary redundancy is strongly prevalent in such countries. No system exists to assist labor properly in standing up for their rights. Cheap labor is readily available in less developed countries and developed countries often end up exploiting this situation. Since their own countries have a strong system-regulating employee and employer relationship, they avail cheaper labor without any hassles in less developed countries (Lewis, pg 189, 2009). However, the international system and regulatory power for employee-employer relations details issues such as age requirements for work, health benefit plans, job security, minimum wage, and retirement plans. There are several agencies working to aim to secure such benefits for employees all over the world (Hollingshead, pg 24-32, 2010). Trade unions and worker associations also do not have full acknowledgement and recognition under the laws of many countries. Hence, workers are unable to negotiate terms and conditions with their companies on a large scale or engage in “collective bargaining”. Mainly, in Third World countries, the blue-collared workers or labor classes lack education and awareness of their rights. These people also lack opportunities and hence are exploited by their employers by being offered low wages and practically no-benefits (Rose, pg 156-230, 2004). White-collar workers or skilled labor is more informed regarding international law; hence, usually such workers do engage in proper contracts and receive competitive salaries, according to their qualifications. They also receive benefits, health insurance, and retirement plans. Most Third World countries also implement international law upon their own government employees. Government employees enjoy proper employee benefits and adequate pays with pay raises whenever adequate. They get the treatment according to international standards of employee-employer relations (Lewis, pg 89-105, 2003). However, only one side of the story should not be accounted for as employees also have an obligation to fulfill their duties during the period of employment. International law states that employees may receive termination if they fail to perform all their duties. Hence, it is mandatory for employees to avoid over emphasizing their powers. In ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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