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Course task project III
Course task project III
3 pages (750 words)
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... task project III task project III Introduction Juvenile delinquency is irrefutably one of the most serious problems not just for criminal justice systems throughout the world, but in mainstream contemporary society at large. According to Henggeler and Schoenwald, S. (2011) more than one million American youths go through juvenile courts annually and more an estimated 160,000 are placed in corrective custody. Offenses committed by adolescents include shoplifting, theft, alcohol and substance abuse, disorderly conduct, vandalism, and varying acts of assault. Many scholars have proposed intervention measures or treatment approaches for juvenile offenders, most of which wield behavioral and psychosocial ...
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Compare and contrast the client-centered (Rogerian) model of counselling with the Gestalt model of counselling. How do you understand the similarities and the differences between them
Compare and contrast the client-centered (Rogerian) model of counselling with the Gestalt model of counselling. How do you understand the similarities and the differences between them
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1
... Analysis of the Client-centered Model of Counselling and the Gestalt Model of Counselling al affiliation Both client-centered and Gestalt models of counselling have been practiced in many countries for more than half of a century. Aims and principles of these two therapies are quite similar. They both believe in human potential for growth and self-actualisation. They both help clients learn how to accept themselves and others. Differences lay in ways how these goals may be achieved. Perls, the father of Gestalt therapy, believed that his patients are supposed to see the total picture of a situation. Clients are supposed to understand what feelings their problems provoke and how these feelings may be...
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Pain management in pallative care
Pain management in pallative care
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Management in Palliative Care Introduction Pain management is one of the most important aspects of care for terminally ill patients under a palliative care setting. In the past, pain was often regarded as a simple response by the brain to a noxious stimulus in the periphery. This nociceptive information was then transmitted along well defined pathways. However the biologic process involved in pain reception is much more complex and is no longer viewed as a simple 'stimulus response' relationship. The International Association for the study of pain has defined pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such...
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Smoking and How to Quit
Smoking and How to Quit
4 pages (1000 words)
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... AND HOW TO QUIT Date: Nicotine use cessation Introduction Evidence based practice is very important in the research of smoking cessation methods. Every research must be supported by some form of good evidence. In the topic under discussion it will be best to follow some guidelines and procedures to help in gathering good information. Evidence based practice uses the 6s model which is hierarchical in nature and constitutes; Original studies, involves what was done in one study. Synopses of studies which involves succinct descriptions of original studies. Synthese...
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Development of Eating Disoder inTeenager using the Cognitive Flexibility Theory
Development of Eating Disoder inTeenager using the Cognitive Flexibility Theory
20 pages (5000 words)
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... Cited A Brief History of Eating Disorders, 20 January 2009, Mental Health Matters, viewed 19 August 2009 from 46http www.mental-health-matters.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=46 Abraham, S. & Llewellyn-Jones, D., 2003, Eating disorders: the facts, New York: Oxford University Press A Summary of Issues, Statistics and Resources (n.d), Renfrew Center.org., viewed 19 August 2009 from http://www.renfrewcenter.com/uploads/resources/1067338472_1.doc Bengston, V. & Schaie, K., 1999, Handbook of theories of aging, New York: Springer Birgegard, A., Bjork, C., Norring, C., Sohlberg, S. & Clinton, S., 23 December 2008, Anorexic self-control and bulimic self-hate: Differential outcome prediction...
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How to Prevent and Reduce Stress at Cleeve Link
How to Prevent and Reduce Stress at Cleeve Link
21 pages (5250 words)
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... to prevent and reduce stress at Cleeve Link Worcester College of Technology Desislava Damyanova CMI:214596 Abstract The information presented in this work gives a clear picture about the stress undergone by employees in Cleeve Link. One part of this work is based on the current research made in Cleeve Link and summaries the main factors of stress occur at work place and how impact on working process. The objective of another part the research were to examine from literature research the main techniques and ways to cope with stress also gives examples of stress prevention model. The third part of this...
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Ethics
Ethics
8 pages (2000 words)
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... within groups Ethics within groups Ethics can be defined as the moral guidelines that direct and manage the manners of conduct of an individual or a set of individuals. The decision of a therapist to either counsel people as a group on individually is dependent on the results presumed. Therefore, therapists demand individuals undergoing therapy to conduct themselves in particular manners. This paper addresses the hot topic of ethics within groups. Ethical issues unique to group therapy and how these issues compare to those from individual counselling are also covered. In addition, this paper elucidates the reasons why a therapist would choose group therapy over individual counselling or vice versa. ...
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Cerebravascular Disorder of Stroke
Cerebravascular Disorder of Stroke
5 pages (1250 words) , Download 1
... therapy which is also known as OT is a form of holistic health care job which aims at promoting health by enabling the individuals particularly the sick patients to perform meaningful as well as purposeful activities all throughout their lives. Stroke is a cerebravascular disorder that affects the central nervous system. The stroke victims need care not only in their physical activities but they are also bound in their psychological requirements. It is here, that the occupational therapists can help the victims. Stroke definition and features Stroke is a disease which is preventable. Stroke is defined as per the World Health Organization to be a clinical syndrome consisting of “rapidly developing cli...
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Self-perception and Attitude
Self-perception and Attitude
1 pages (250 words)
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... Formation/ Self-perception and Attitude Cognitive Dissonance I have always believed that smoking is something which is not only socially unacceptable, but also is detrimental for a person’s health. However owing to some mishaps in life, last year I started smoking on regular basis. Every time I lighted a cigarette, I waged a war with my beliefs. This resulted in a lot of frustration and disgust. However, to deal with these negative feelings, I either had to change my habit or change my beliefs. With the help of therapy sessions, I was able to overcome the anger and frustration and thus, left smoking for good (Greenwald & Ronis, 1978). Physical Punishment vs. Positive Reinforcement When teachers use ...
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Insomnia
Insomnia
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 2
... Insomnia Insomnia Insomnia, a sleep related disorder characterized by the inability to fall asleep, or staying awake for long time, is often an indication of a sign and symptom accompanying several medical, sleep and psychiatric disorders. The main characteristic of insomnia, being the lack of sleep by an individual or unwillingly staying awake over long periods, evidently shows a disturbed individual or one suffering from, other related disorders. Functional impairment while awake typically precedes the insomnia in an individual. Although insomnia is a common disorder among the elderly people, there is no specific age where an individual can develop this disorder. Treating the condition immediately ...
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Critically evaluate the use of neurofeedback techniques as a mechanism for enhancing human performance
Critically evaluate the use of neurofeedback techniques as a mechanism for enhancing human performance
11 pages (2750 words)
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... Year of study: Topic: Critically evaluate the use of neurofeedback techniques as a mechanism for enhancing human performance. Introduction This report is a critical evaluation of the use of neurofeedback techniques as a mechanism for enhancing human performance. The author presents a working definition of the term Neurofeedback, followed by some background information of the technique as it is used in the medical field. The report then presents a detailed discussion of the technique highlighting its clinical effectiveness as a therapeutic measure in training patients to overcome their problematic conditions and probably improve their performances. The report also differentiates neurofeedback from...
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Preventative medicine 3
Preventative medicine 3
8 pages (2000 words)
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... PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE AND MEDICINE: STRATEGIES FOR POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN Preventive Health Care and Medicine: Strategies for Post-Menopausal WomenOne of the most important tasks of health care personnel and facilities is to maintain the overall health and well-being of citizens to an optimum level, because it is a common belief that healthy citizens are productive citizens (Katz, et al., 2007). However, while facilities can do so much to achieve this goal, it is still up to the people if they wish to remain as healthy as possible, especially since they have greater control over their own health habits. This can happen successfully if health care personnel such as general practitioners, family...
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Theories and theorists with the causes and responses to problematic behaviour in children
Theories and theorists with the causes and responses to problematic behaviour in children
11 pages (2750 words)
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... Compose a brief review of literature discussing theories and theorists with the causes and responses to problematic behaviour in children. (1500 words) There are many theories and approaches which can be used to explore the causes and responses to problematic behaviour in children. One of the most basic debates revolves around the respective importance of the features and qualities that a child is born with, and those that are acquired from the environment as a child matures in the company of other people. This is known as the nature/nurture debate (Eysenk, 1997, 305-309) and a number of psychologists have devised experiments to try and work this out, so that more can be understood about how a child ...
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
19 pages (4750 words) , Download 1
... Behavioral Therapy As an Intervention for New Mothers’ Postpartum Depression and Difficulties with Attachment to Their Newborns This study aims to test if Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) will be effective in helping women to deal with post partum depression (PPS) and attachment with their newborn infants. Thirty (30) women in the first trimester of gestation will be recruited from a local clinic to participate in this study. They will be randomly assigned to a control group and an experimental group. All the subjects will answer the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Beck Depression Inventory- II (BDI-II) before and after they give birth and the Mother-Infant Attachment Scale...
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Tuberous sclerosis
Tuberous sclerosis
9 pages (2500 words) , Download 1
... sclerosis I. Introduction Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disease. It affects different vital organs of the human body. Most commonly tuberous sclerosis provokes formation of tumors in brain, kidney, skin, heart and lungs. These tumors are not cancerous and usually do not cause any serious problems with health. The lesions are caused by mutation in tumor suppressor genes. Without timely diagnose, tumors can cause different symptoms such as epilepsy, disorder of brain functioning, learning and behavior disability in children, defects in the heart and lungs. There is no simple universal treatment for tuberous sclerosis, because of its phenotype variation. The most common drugs to...
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Health Promotion and Prevention: Alcohol Misuse
Health Promotion and Prevention: Alcohol Misuse
7 pages (1750 words) , Download 1
... Health Promotion and Prevention: Alcohol Misuse The aim of this essay is provide a comprehensive analysis of the health promotion and prevention policies and strategies that the National Health Service in the UK and Hillingdon employ to combat alcohol misuse as a public health issue. Question One One of the most significant public health problems in the UK is alcohol misuse, with more than 15million people consuming alcohol above the stipulated government guidelines. The National Health Service incurs significant expenses, estimated around ?2.7 billion every year. Statistics indicate that in 2006-2007, there were more than 811,000 hospital admissions related to alcohol, an increase of about 71%....
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Bi-Polar Disorder Treatment
Bi-Polar Disorder Treatment
8 pages (2000 words)
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... head: Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment Number: of of Institution: Name of Instructor: 2013 Abstract Bipolar disorder is a psychiatric illness that is most prevalent in the adolescent period but also affects adults. Early intervention should be applied as it may result into serious symptoms, like death of the patient. The World Health Organization considers BD as a leading cause of disability. One of the most common symptoms for BD is depression, though clinicians described mania and hypomania as the common symptoms. Mania includes behavioural and cognitive wherein the patient displays symptoms of pressured speech and reduced sleep and other...
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Separation related behavior in dogs and cats: separation anxiety, over attachment
Separation related behavior in dogs and cats: separation anxiety, over attachment
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1
... related behaviour in Dogs and Cats: Separation Anxiety Separation-related anxiety is a common behavioural disorder in dogs and cats, diagnosed in 20-40% of cases presented to speciality behaviour clinics in the U.S. and Great Britain (Schwartz, 2003). It is not quite clear what causes the disorder. However, evidence suggests that the separation anxiety could be as a result of the social nature of dogs and cats and their tendency to form an attachment to certain human beings. Signs of Separation Anxiety It has been observed that dogs with parting anxiety show the disorder when they are left alone. In many cases, Lund and Jorgensen (1999) note that the characteristic anxiety usually occurs within 20-4...
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Anti-social personality disorder
Anti-social personality disorder
3 pages (750 words)
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... personality disorder of the module 3 March Anti-social personality disorder Anti-social personality disorders (ASPD), ever since it evolved in the 18th and 19th centuries, have been viewed as behavioural disorders that prevent individuals to lead a normal social life. While ASPD has initially been linked with ‘criminality and immoral behavior’ (Rotgers & Maniacci p. 3) it is today characterized by such personality traits as impulsivity, high negative emotionality, low conscientiousness, irresponsibility, exploitative behavior, recklessness, deceitfulness, unstable interpersonal relationships, disregard for the consequences of one’s behavior, lack of remorse, repeated criminal acts, and complete...
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The impact of domestic violence on children: an art therapy case study
The impact of domestic violence on children: an art therapy case study
40 pages (10000 words)
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... This project explores lives of children who witnessed domestic violence and how art therapy is an approach to further self development. Firstly, the characteristics of children who witness domestic violence is reviewed. Secondly, the effect/impact of witnessing violence will be reviewed. Finally, the review explores the applications of art therapy and its places in children who witness violence’s self development. A summary of the theoretical literature is also included. [To be rephrased]. Literature Review – (will compare and edit with second assignment) In many abusive relationships, the welfare of the child or children of the couple is ignored even though they are witnessing abuse and experiencin...
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Intervention to increase physical activity in residents of a care home
Intervention to increase physical activity in residents of a care home
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1
... to Increase Physical Activity in Residents of a Care Home Introduction Frequent physical activity is related to improved health and minimised rates of contracting disease. Besides this, physical activity has numerous health gains including the reduce risk of various illnesses such as osteoporosis, cancer, depression and arthritis (Resnik, 2012:50). In spite of these benefits accruing from the regular physical activity, only a minimal percentage of the population participates in the recommended level of physical activity. Recent health studies indicate that physical activity is among the leading indicators of a healthy lifestyle and have made suggestions to increase the level of physical activity in...
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SOCIAL SCIENCE (PATIENT NARRATIVE)
SOCIAL SCIENCE (PATIENT NARRATIVE)
12 pages (3000 words) , Download 1
... to health and social care in contemporary times Unit d Introduction The traditional foundations of the biomedical model did not actually consider the human side of patients and concentrated majorly on the administration of relevant drugs to the patients according to the experts’ diagnostic results. Jewson (1976, p. 235), analysis of the biomedical model indicate that according to the model, “the patient” was “designated a passive and uncritical role in the consultative relationship and his main function “is to “endure and wait.” This is what Doyal (1983, p.31) refers to when he says that in the traditional models “chronic diseases have become more important than the persons who harbor them.”...
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Identify the Impact of Pathophysiology, Psychology and Sociology in Determining the Physical and Mental Health Status of the Ind
Identify the Impact of Pathophysiology, Psychology and Sociology in Determining the Physical and Mental Health Status of the Ind
3 pages (750 words)
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... Identify the Impact of Pathophysiology, Psychology and Sociology in Determining the Physical and Mental Health Status of Each Individual across theLifespan Total Number of Words: 601 Purpose This report will discuss about the impact of pathophysiology, psychology and sociology in determining Lucinda’s physical and mental health status. Pathophysiology, Psychology and Sociology Lucinda’s level of Alzheimer’s disease can be diagnosed by identifying a combination of neurological explanations, behavioural and physical changes, and psychological symptoms (Plotnik and Kouyoumdjian, 2011, p. 47). As a common knowledge, Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary. The fact that Lucinda’s grandfather had dementia...
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Counseling and Psychotherapy
Counseling and Psychotherapy
4 pages (1000 words)
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... and Behaviorist approaches to counseling and psychotherapy of the of the School Humanisticapproaches Rogers' person-centred therapy (1951) The aim of this approach is to facilitate personal growth through the relationship between the therapist and the client. The focus is very much on the present rather than the past. Of all the therapies, this is the least directive, because Rogers felt that true personal growth would only occur when people became more able to think through problems and make decisions for themselves. The therapist's role is that of an 'active listener' who provides an atmosphere of trust and warmth in which growth can occur. Many mental disorders are felt to result from the client...
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Sexuality and Relationships
Sexuality and Relationships
3 pages (750 words) , Download 2
... Sexuality and Relationships General Framework There are many challenges facing couples in sexual relationships. Whenrelationships involve sex, they become overwhelming, satisfying, energizing, freeing, comforting, as well as puzzling, hurting and frustrating. Many emotions are involved, such as feelings of jealousy and possessiveness. Issues of risk and commitment, passion, power and sensitivity rise up. Sexual relationship is a social aspect that should provide happiness and satisfaction. Frequent horrific news I read from the newspapers and watch on the television drive me into wanting to take a closer look at this and bring to knowledge what really happens. This is why learning about sexual...
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Grief
Grief
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1
... left untreated can be detrimental to one's health and even result in death Man is to innumerable pains and sorrows by the very condition of humanity, and yet, as if nature had not sown evils enough in life, we are continually adding grief to grief and aggravating the common calamity by our cruel treatment of one another. Joseph Addison Abstract In a psychological context grief is how we as humans respond to loss and it has a medley of social and physical implications for the one affected. Grief can stem from many causes and is especially damaging to mental and physical health. Empirical studies have even sought out to prove that if it is left untreated, grief can ultimately result in loss. This e...
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Psychology in a Case of an Elderly Experiencing Depression
Psychology in a Case of an Elderly Experiencing Depression
13 pages (3250 words) , Download 1
... The study focuses on the field of psychology as a science that deals with social care. The study tackles the application of theoretical perspectives of psychology in a case of an elderly experiencing depression. It then focuses on the Psychodynamic approach, as a method of counseling in assisting the elderly coping with adjustments in life and experiencing depression. The study expounds on the different elements of the psychoanalysis theory, and the method in which sessions are executed in a psychodynamic approach of counsel. It concludes with the concept of psychotherapy, with its significance during a person’s recovery state- to achieve optimal health and well being. Introduction Suicide and...
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What are the benefits and drawbacks to using medications in treating psychological disorders
What are the benefits and drawbacks to using medications in treating psychological disorders
6 pages (1500 words)
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... and Sur Due benefits and drawbacks to using medications in treating psychological disorders A Critical Review Psychological disorders have become the bane of the human race which considers itself the most intelligent of living beings on this planet. Lower animals seldom suffer from such disorders and if at all, they usually overcome them all on their own, with minimal medical assistance. Thus a psychological disorder appears to be a function of high intelligence and an overtly active and analytical mind. Identification of a psychological disorder is also heavily biased by what the human race or particular culture or society considers ‘normal’. With the advent of very superior inroads into the...
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NRS409 - Psychosocial Interventions in Mental
NRS409 - Psychosocial Interventions in Mental
12 pages (3000 words)
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... The mood of an individual reflects his or her pervasive and enduring of mental and emotional health where as the affect refers to the external expression of the emotional state of the client. Sometimes, people go through sadness, moments of depression, low energy level and exhaustion with the desire to be left alone. Such feelings are accompanied along agitation, slow thinking process and noise intolerance which makes the decision making process difficult. In our case study, the 23 year old consumer appeared to have symptoms of depression. He can get more vulnerable with the lack or absence of social support. Such mood alterations are considered normal to life until they do not interfere or disrupt...
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Traumatic Brain Injury in the military
Traumatic Brain Injury in the military
5 pages (1250 words) , Download 2
... Brain Injury in Military Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is an important health-related challenge affecting military service personnel both during war and when at peace (DVBIC, 2009). The rates of injury are however high during combat operations and this directly and indirectly affects not only the individual combater, but also the retention of the troops and readiness of the units. Infact, it will not be exaggerated if one goes to the extent of saying that TBI affects every aspect of the service of the Department of Defence and also the Department of Veteran Affairs (DVBIC, 2009). TBI can have severe impact on the individuals and can affect them all through their life. According to DHCC (2010), "TBI...
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Approaches to stress management other than the hardiness approach
Approaches to stress management other than the hardiness approach
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Stress Management Stress management approaches can be either biological or psychological with the aim of lessening the negative effects brought about by stress. Stress has been known to have major impacts on the person involved although some positive effects do surface because of stress; the most worrying are the negative. This is due to the impact that it has on the affected person and in extreme cases, it could lead to suicide, murder or physical harm to themselves and or others. The biological approach to stress management basically tries to control how the body responds to stress through reducing one’s psychological activity and the best biological method that is well known and accepted to...
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Comparison of Three Counseling Theories
Comparison of Three Counseling Theories
5 pages (1250 words) , Download 1
... Comparison of Three Counseling Theories Introduction Counseling theories are important to the study of counseling because they provide a way for students and practitioners to guide their practice. Whether the counselor works in an agency or in other organizations, theories provide them with an understanding of what to expect in any situations. Also, counseling theories have been used as the foundation for understanding a variety of disorders and how clients with these disorders can be understood on a basic level. This research paper will define three counseling theories that include client-centered theory, cognitive theory and holistic theory. 2 Client Centered Theory Carl Rogers is credited with...
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Sociology in Healthcare
Sociology in Healthcare
6 pages (1500 words)
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... in Healthcare A brief analysis of the importance of social aspects Sociology in healthcare is a very complex issue and its importance is being increasingly perceived. The implications of sociology in healthcare can be rightly said to be as crucial as the treatment itself. However the understanding and application of relevant social knowledge into this field is also becoming increasingly difficult due to newer health issues and health threats. The steps taken to tackle these in any society may be hindered or facilitated by the belief, culture and economy existing in that society. Therefore the social set up relevant to the healthcare of any society must be rightly identified and studied through...
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Criminal Behaviour
Criminal Behaviour
3 pages (750 words)
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... Behaviour - Psychopathy: Treatment, Profiling of Psychopaths, Personality Disorder 2006 A personality disorder is characterized by a history of continuous and chronic antisocial behaviour that is not attributable to severe mental retardation, schizophrenia, or manic episodes, and is also called antisocial personality. This is a synonym for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), a category listed in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and is applicable to the majority of criminals. The distinction between psychopathy and ASPD is of considerable significance to the mental health and criminal justice systems. In the UK, 'psychopatic disorder' is a l...
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Evidence-Based Practice Project
Evidence-Based Practice Project
15 pages (3750 words)
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... of Lowering Blood Glucose v. Standard Treatment in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Research shows mixed results for the anticipatedtherapeutic intervention of intensive glucose lowering in patients with Type 2 diabetes, and whether intensive glucose lowering leads to an impact on major macro and microvascular outcomes. In the Action to Control (2008) study, the researchers found that that the intensive glucose lowering increased mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal strokes. Cai-Hong (2013) study combined intensive blood glucose lowering with gliclazide MR, AND blood pressure lowering with preterax. The study found that the combination of blood glucose lowering and blood pressure...
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Literature Review on Weight Loss interventions in Psychology
Literature Review on Weight Loss interventions in Psychology
10 pages (2500 words)
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... Review on Weight Loss interventions in Psychology Introduction This paper will review research literature on weight loss treatments and importantly, how successful they are in the long term while considering any ethical issues that need to be taken into account in weight-loss approaches. Precisely, this paper will follow a qualitative research methodology in reviewing the current state of research evidence on effectiveness of weight loss approaches over an extended follow-up period in women while identifying recommendations that can be effective in the case of Elizabeth, a 38-year-old woman of over healthy weight in need of help with weight-loss. Specifically, this paper will highlight the public...
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Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial Infarction
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Myocardial Infarction Heart is the most vital organ in the body. It is the muscular pump that supplies blood to every organ and tissue to sustain life. Its own blood supply is however critical to life. The adequate function of heart depends upon the balance between its own metabolic demand and the supply of blood. An imbalance in this predisposes the heart muscle to ischemia, which means reduced blood flow. The tissue death as a result of ischemia occurs because of two reasons, reduced oxygen supply and the decreased delivery of nutrients, both of which are brought in by the flow of blood though the heart muscle. The area deprived of blood supply is said to have suffered ischemic injury. The...
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John Nash and schizophrenia
John Nash and schizophrenia
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Nash and schizophrenia Case study “A beautiful mind” is a movie based on the life of an American mathematician, Josh Nash who suffers from schizophrenia. The film depicts John Nash as an arrogant and awkwardly socially inept mathematician who has spent most of his time making discoveries in mathematics. It is only halfway during the movie that the audience is able to discover that many of the situations and places occurring during this movie are only in josh’s beautiful mind. The illusions are what lead to the discovery that John Nash is suffering from a psychological condition known as schizophrenia (Parker & Parker, 2004). John Nash, as per the movie, is a male student of mathematics who attains t...
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Psychology
Psychology
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1
... A American Psychiatric Association has, in the year 2000, published the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The DSM-IV-TR, the latest version of DSM available in 2010 sites around seven measures to determine Substance Dependence in people. In the event of meeting three or more of the given criteria a year, could be defined as Substance Dependence (Walton and Milton 2010). The manual specifies that substance is used for a longer period than indented duration in an ever increasing quantity could be termed as a sign of Substance Dependence. Such disorder might drive the person to spend a great deal of time in trying to acquire and use the substance. While they persistently wish ...
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The Rehabilitation Process after Acquired Brain Injury
The Rehabilitation Process after Acquired Brain Injury
30 pages (7500 words)
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... this project, the researcher will investigate how the perception of vocational competence influences the adaptation process of day-to-day functioning in patients with acquired brain injury. Vocational competency is the ability of an individual to both carry out and complete functional tasks in the workplace. Within the context of this project, the researcher will investigate the degree in which patients with acquired brain injury rate their vocational competency and how this relates to their rehabilitation in carrying out tasks in all parts of life. The researcher will identify when, where and how patients adapt to this condition. Acquired brain injury is a term that describes damage to the brain tha...
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Pathological worrying
Pathological worrying
6 pages (1500 words)
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... and Personality Psychology What are the main features of pathological worrying and how does worrying contribute to generalised anxiety disorder Worry is a feature of most people's lives at some point. Everyone worries every now and then. When people's worries are uncontrollable, excessive and chronically present it interrupts with people's daily lives and people experience loss of enjoyment of living, life can become intolerable and may result in a condition known as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). GAD is chronic worry about multiple life circumstances (Edelmann, 1992). O'Neill (1986, cited in Eysenck and Mathews, 1991) states that both anxiety and worry are associated with identical behavioural ...
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Comparison of Film and Literature
Comparison of Film and Literature
4 pages (1000 words)
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... have very limited choices in the present-day society. As products of the society, their mind is conditioned by the values and trends established by the society, and it is these ideals that can be held responsible on many occasions for an individual's downfall. In this paper, I attempt to depict this contaminating influence of the society through a comparison between two texts: one, the movie A Clockwork Orange (1971) and the other a literary text, a piece of non-fiction prose by Brent Staples' "A Brother's Murder" (1986). Brent Staples' "A Brother's Murder" first appeared in an edition of New York Time Magazine in 1986 in a column for personal essays called "About Men". Brent writes articles and e...
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Reflective Diary
Reflective Diary
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Diary Affiliation: I am busy in my office when this lady with a disturbed look on her face enters in need of counselling services. She was on my 11 o’clock appointment list and her name is simply indicated as Jane. In respect of boundaries in counselling, I do not ask her what her problem is but offer her a seat after the initial greetings and wait for her to say something. She starts by telling me about her journey to the office and a few other pieces of information not really hinting on the subject of her appointment. As mentioned by Sawyer, Peters & Willis, (2013) about counselling skills, I listen keenly but take a few notes on relevant issues about her life such as her neighbourhood and family. ...
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Psychology Case Study
Psychology Case Study
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Case #3 Case #3 Identify the disorder of the client in the case that you selected. Cite three non-required text sources to support your diagnosis. The client has a panic disorder with agoraphobia. According to the criteria of diagnosis used in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), panic disorder is identified when there are repeated sudden panic attacks. The attacks are not because of immediate psychological results of a substance and also are not better justified by a different mental disorder like social phobia which is agoraphobia (DSM IV Panic Disorder Criteria, 2011). All of which are seen in the history of the client. Smith, Robinson & Segal (2011) illustrate...
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Nursing Master Essay
Nursing Master Essay
17 pages (4250 words)
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... OF NURSING EVALUATION OF THE NURSING ROLE IN ASSISTING PATIENTS COPING WITH PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DIFFICULTIES FOLLOWING LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION Student's Name/ Author: University name/ Affiliated to: To critically analyse the impact of psychological coping strategies on the patient's life outcome Abstract The critical analysis of the impact of the outcomes in the patient's life talks about the psychological coping strategies. The psychosocial implications along with psychological factors were included in the study. The social and family causes for the implications and the ways to cope them were discussed. By thinking the thoughts as reflections of the deeds the cognitive method...
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Evidence 2
Evidence 2
14 pages (3500 words)
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... Practice Before internet entered millions of lives, the role of physicians, nurses and other medical personnel were simply to providepatients instructions and care on disease management (Aujoulat, d’Hoore, & Deccache, 2007). They are considered medical experts and their decisions for patients usually remain unquestioned, giving them an active role in either improving or maintaining the health of their clients. Patients have a more passive role in this relationship, mostly listening and practising health instructions or drinking any prescriptions given by their doctors, trusting their medical knowledge fully (Epstein & Street, 2011). Until the early 90’s, patients mostly ask medical personnel health...
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Schizophrenia Essay
Schizophrenia Essay
5 pages (1250 words)
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... ON BRAIN DYSFUNCTION AND BEHAVIOUR CLOZAPINE DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT BY EEG FOR TO . BY .. CLOZAPINE DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT BY EEG ABSTRACT Schizophrenia is a psychic behavioural disorder characterized by typical impairments in the perception and expression of reality with significant social or occupational dysfunction. A person suffering from schizophrenia demonstrates disorganized thinking and experiences delusions or auditory hallucinations.Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug widely used in refractory Schizophrenia. However, drug toxicity, side effects, mortality and tolerability of the drug is a matter of...
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Learning Theories and Role of Memory
Learning Theories and Role of Memory
9 pages (2250 words)
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... Learning Theories and Role of Memory Introduction Learning refers to the persistent change that is brought about in the performance of humans. It is a permanent change in the behaviors and knowledge level of an individual. Learning theories are the frameworks which are developed for describing how the information is absorbed, processed and retained at the time of learning by the individual. The six principal types of learning theories include behaviorism, cognitive theory, social learning theory, social constructivism, multiple intelligence theory and brain based learning. In the paper, the main focus has been on explaining the cognitive and behavioural theories. Along with this, there is comparison ...
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Nursing Assignment
Nursing Assignment
10 pages (2500 words)
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... A case study of a young woman with chronic, recurrent psoriasis is presented. In addition to the standard treatments for psoriasis, the nursing care mainly consisted of patient education, counselling and specific psychological therapies. Patient background and history A 24-year-old woman presented in the skin department in July 2005 with a history of progressively worsening psoriasis for the past eleven years with frequent remissions and exacerbations. The complaints had increased since the past one-month. The patient gave a history of intense itching of her skin and scalp, which was worse during winters and during the night. She also complained of pain in the joints of her fingers, feet and ankl...
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Environmental health ;my topic : lead paint, children, Germany
Environmental health ;my topic : lead paint, children, Germany
8 pages (2000 words)
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... Exposure in Children Introduction Lead is a heavy metal which has been useful for human beings for several decades (Marcus, . However,it is a toxic substance and can cause many acute and chronic health problems in both children and adults. One of the important sources of lead in the environment is lead paint, which is the most common source of toxicity in children (Crane, 2009). It virtually affects every organ in the body and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. Infact, in modern times, lead toxicity is the most important environment-related illness affecting children. It can lead to various organ system problems and affect the learning and behavior of the child (Marcus, 2010). It is ...
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