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3: Bureaucracy in Schools - Assignment Example

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Bureaucracy in Schools Author Institution Introduction A professional community refers to a school that allows teachers to strive a concise shared purpose for all students’ learning; to pursue a collaborative effort to attain the purpose, and to take up collective responsibility for learning…
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Assignment 3: Bureaucracy in Schools
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Download file to see previous pages Learning organizations are able to acquire knowledge and innovate fast enough so as to survive the rapidly changing environment by generating a culture that stimulates and supports continuous employee learning, fresh ideas, and critical thinking; value employee contributions and allow mistakes; learn from both experiment and experience; and, disseminate the fresh knowledge throughout the organization. Learning organizations possess five core attributes, namely: systems thinking, mental models, personal mastery, shared vision, and team learning (Schlechty, 2009). Significance of Traditional Education Traditional learning largely focuses on teaching rather than learning based on the assertion that each ounce of teaching translates to an ounce of learning. Traditional education fosters the adoption of progressive education practices, an enhanced holistic approach that spotlights individual students’ needs and self-expression (Schlechty, 2009). The core function of traditional education centers on transmitting to a next generation those skills, standards and facts of moral and social conduct deemed necessary for the next generation’s material and social success. ...
Standards ensure that all teachers possess the skills, potential, and aptitude, which is pertinent to equip the children with the education that they require to prepare for the future within a rapidly changing and increasingly intricate world. Quality standards work to guarantee that there is a focus spotlighting attainment of outcomes for children via high-quality education programs. The involvement level of state and federal agencies in standards The U.S. has undergone dramatic changes since the initial debates regarding public schools. The federal government has for extended played a part within the distribution of funding to state and local school districts for certain needs and guarantee consistency across districts and states. The involvement of state and federal agencies in standards is pertinent in guaranteeing that education remain standardized across schools, especially in an age where there is limited information available to aid families select the best service for their children. The involvement of state and federal agencies aids to raise the quality of education across states through the national quality standard in which all services will have to work. The level of government involvement in school standards Some people root for national standards to be developed and implemented outside the federal government while some people root for federal legislation. Concepts for launching national education standards vary from a general proposition dictating that all schools aid students attain some shared degree of learning to an elevated proposal “content standards” be launched and appraised in periodic surveys (Schlechty, 2009). As such, national standards seek to ensure that content standards and ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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