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Science Education - Research Paper Example

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This essay, Science Education, stresses that the history of science has been the history of paradigm changes, where a major discovery in science forces scientists, researchers, and ultimately teachers to reconsider their means of understanding the world…
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Science Education
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Download file to see previous pages From this paper it is clear that although it is difficult to link the beginning of modern scientific thought to a single idea or individual, one of the most foundational thinkers of modern science education is Galileo Galilei. Indeed, Galileo has been referred to as the Father of Modern Science. Galileo emerged during the Renaissance when European culture began to question many of the long-entrenched beliefs that were accepted throughout the Middle Ages. Indeed, the Renaissance refers to a return to earlier times, namely Greek antiquity when intellectual culture and philosophy flourished. 
As the report declares the most significant contribution to science education after Galileo’s discoveries, were those made by Isaac Newton. Newton was a truly astonishing person. While most famous scientists are recognized for developing a single idea, Newton is credited with discoveries in physics, mathematics, and astronomy. Today Newton is recognized most prominently for the discoveries he articulated in his book Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. This book is perhaps the single most important book in the history of science as it established the way we viewed the world and the universe until Albert Einstein would amend many of these ideas in the early 20th century. In this book Newton established the three laws of motion, which would constitute foundational modes of understanding in both astronomy and physics....
230). With the development of the telescope Galileo could view and record aspects of the universe that had eluded scientists and astronomers for centuries. It was not long before Galileo developed a revolutionary change in the way modern science education views the universe. Specifically, Galileo came to realize that rather than the planets and Sun revolving around the Earth, it was the Earth that revolved around the Sun. Galileo’s discovery was so astounding and revolutionary that it was violently rejected by many individuals and institutions. Perhaps most notably the Catholic Church condemned Galileo for heresy (Cole 1986, p. 30). This resulted in him being forced to recant his statements and live his life under house arrest (Cole 1986, p. 30). Ultimately, however, Galileo’s ideas would last the test of time and now are implemented in science textbooks everywhere. Perhaps the most significant contribution to science education after Galileo’s discoveries, were those made by Isaac Newton. Newton was a truly astonishing person. While most famous scientists are recognized for developing a single idea, Newton is credited with discoveries in physics, mathematics, and astronomy. Today Newton is recognized most prominently for the discoveries he articulated in his book Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. This book is perhaps the single most important book in the history of science as it established the way we viewed the world and the universe until Albert Einstein would amend many of these ideas in the early 20th century. In this book Newton established the three laws of motion, which would constitute foundational modes of understanding in both astronomy and physics (Gaukroger 2006, p. 270). These laws of motions would ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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