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Forensic Biology - Term Paper Example

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The object of this paper is forensic biology, the scientific application of biological techniques to law enforcement practices. It, in particular, includes various sub-disciplines of forensic botany, forensic anthropology, forensic entomology, and DNA based technologies…
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Forensic Biology
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Download file to see previous pages It is evidently clear from the discussion that forensic anthropology is the identification and recovery of remains as applied in extreme situations where conventional techniques are proved to be unable to effectively and correctly determine the precise identity of the remains. It applies the science of physical anthropology and human osteology within legal settings, i.e. in criminal cases where the victim’s remains are in the advanced stages of decomposition. Anthropologists, who study forensic anthropology, are able to concisely figure out some features based on the skeletal remains. For instance race, age, sex, and statures can in most instances be determined by both taking accounts of the remains and analyzing the structural clues in the bones that are decomposed, burned, mutilated and are unrecognizable. Further still, it can help in determining if an individual under investigation was affected by accidental or violent trauma/ disease before or at the time of his/ her death. This study (Forensic Anthropology) uses scientific approaches in the determination and identification of an individual’s identity, duration since death, the causes of death, and the manner in which the death incidence occurred. All these procedures are carried out in accordance to well-spelled codes of ethics provided by the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in the Ethical Code of AAA. In the case where the identified bone represents a human bone, an investigator has to identify the bone elements present/ absent. In the first instances, anthropologists begin the processes by organizing the recovered bones on a table as they would be in a living person – anatomical position. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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