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An Anthropological Perspective ofa Buddhist Ceremony - Essay Example

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Buddhism is a religion that targets approximately over 300 million followers from all spheres of the world. Buddhism originates from the term “Budhi” which simply means “to awaken” (Buswell 2003)…
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An Anthropological Perspective ofa Buddhist Ceremony
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Download file to see previous pages Buddhism has been in existence for many years now and approximately 2500 years ago, Siddhartha Gautama, referred to as Buddha, was on his own awakened (enlightened) at the age of 35 (Bechert, & Richard Gombrich 1984). Buddhism goes further than religion or ritual and is significantly related to a philosophy or a way of life. The reason why Buddhism is seen as a philosophy is due to the fact that philosophy stands for love of wisdom and the Buddhist course can be summarized as a religion that fosters moral lifestyle, is mindful and aware of thoughts and actions and helps in developing wisdom and understanding (Bechert, et al.,1984). Buddhism illustrates a value of life, goals and objectives as it explains evident unfairness and inequality in all parts of the world and it offers a code of customs, way of life or actions that bring about proper happiness (Ajahn 2010). In the present day, Buddhism is becoming accepted for a wide range of reasons. This is due to the fact that Buddhism is said to provide solutions to a number of problems in the contemporary material world. Buddhism also encompass the people who are concerned with profound understanding of the cognitive world the human beings and the natural therapies that that expert psychologists in all spheres of the world are finding out to be equally very sophisticated and helpful (Davidson 2003). Siddhartha Gautama was born in a noble family in Lumbini, found in Nepal in 563 BC. At the age of 29 Gautama discovered that riches and lavishness did not ascertain happiness, therefore he discovered the diverse teachings of religions and philosophy with the intention of finding the explanation to human happiness (Donath 1971). 6 years after study and meditation, he in the end established “the middle path’ and was enlightened. Subsequent to becoming enlightened, Buddha used most of his time imparting knowledge, values and principles of Buddhism referred to Dhamma, or truth, until his passing away at the age of 80 (Dzongsar 2011). Gautama was never a God and he never claimed to be one. He was a man who focused in teaching a course to enlightenment from his own experiences. Buddhists at times pay tribute to images of the Buddha, however not in worship not to solicit favors (Gethin 1998). A statue Buddha with hands rested lightly in his lap and a gentle smile is reminiscent of the need to working hard to create peace and love in ourselves. Bending over ritual to the statue in the Buddhism ceremony is a gesture of appreciation for the teachings. Above all, one major lesson in the ceremony of Buddha is the riches do not guarantee happiness and as well riches are not permanent. Today, it is evident that many people from different parts of the world suffer however those who fully understand the teaching of Buddha can find true happiness (Goldstein 2002). There are varying kinds of Buddhism for the reason that the focus alternates from nation to nation on account of traditions and way of life. In actual fact, the real meaning of the teaching does not vary at all despite in the Dhamma or the truth (Goldstein, et al., 2002). Buddhism is as well a belief system that tolerates other beliefs, myths, taboos or religions. Buddhism is in agreement with the moral values of other religions. However, Buddhism goes ahead to provide a long lasting objective in our existence based on wisdom and true understanding (Bechert, et al., 1984). Actual Buddhism is significantly forbearing and not worried with labels like Christian, Muslim or Hindu. This is in fact the main reason why there have never been any conflicts based on the name of Buddhism. This is because Buddhists do not preach and attempt to convert, only illustrate in case a ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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