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Evolution Of The Women Rights In The United States - Term Paper Example

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The paper "Evolution Of The Women Rights In The United States" discusses several significant changes during the year 1848, that society underwent in terms of rights and privileges in the different sectors that forever changed the lives of men and women in the country…
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Evolution Of The Women Rights In The United States
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Download file to see previous pages One of the most prominent social activists of that era was Elizabeth Cady Stanton who was one of the people who started the social revolution for women’s rights at the Seneca Falls Convention in New York in 1848 (McMillen, 2008). Together with other social activists at that time, Stanton organized the movement to champion women’s rights and rights to vote. The movement initiated by these groups of activists made a lasting change in the American system and gave women more rights and protection under the law to allow them to enjoy more freedom.
Using the story of a person to describe the changing roles of women over a certain period can be a double edge sword. Writing a bibliography entails a lot more than just interviewing the person who lives you want to write about. Note that a bibliography is the account of the life and the social events that affected the lives of the subject so it is very important to get the facts right from the start to get a more accurate picture of what really transpired during the lifetime of the subject. As it is, there are pros and cons when it comes to using the story of the subject as the main source of information for writing the paper.
The advantages of using the story of the subject as the main source of information are that it lends character to the paper and it gives a more poignant human interest angle. You see, when you interview the subject, that person gives her or his account of the events that happen according to his or her understanding. By using the story of the subject as the focal point of the paper will allow you to get another perspective of what really happened during that time and how the people involved in the events that transpired during that period reacted to these events. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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