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Teaching: Diabetic Teaching - Term Paper Example

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Teaching: Diabetic Teaching [Author’s Name] [Institution] Abstract Modern nursing programs face the need to make changes in the ways students are taught to act as educators. Nurses as diabetes educators are viewed as an inseparable part of the healthcare team that works to improve care of diabetic patients…
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Download file to see previous pages The paper focuses on social constructivism as the foundation of diabetic education for nurses. Teaching: Diabetic Teaching Introduction Modern nursing programs face the need to make changes in the ways students are taught to act as educators. Candela, Dalley, and Benzel-Lindley (2006) admit that a lot of nurse educators these days use the same teaching methods to instruct as they had been taught; their major contribution is thus in merely rearranging the same study material they have been presenting for years. At the same time, the emphasis in teaching nurses, as Candela et al (2006) rightfully admit, needs to be shifted away from traditional knowledge acquisition skills via a variety of media to a non-linear approach to teaching and learning which is expected to improve critical thinking skills of future nurses. Giddens & Brady (2007) advocate the need to incorporate into the nursing curriculum such courses that are concept-based and in which concepts are taught across a person’s life span and various clinical settings. ...
hey need to be capable of reflection, self-critique, lifelong education, and self-direction; they should have the ability to link concepts, do the synthesis of information, and demonstrate critical thinking skills (Brandon & All, 2010). Thus, it is imperative to synthesize extant approaches to teaching nurses as future educators and decide on the theoretical framework that is the most pertinent to nurse education. The importance of innovative approaches to teaching future diabetes educators is based on the fact that diabetes education is critical in helping people manage their disease and avoid grim consequences including lethal outcomes. Diabetes is a chronic life-long disease which is known to be primarily managed by an individual. Successful self-management of diabetes is based on the level of the individual’s knowledge, ability to effectively cope with the disease on a psychological level, and necessary psychomotor skills (Mendoza, Welbeck, & Parikh, 2010, p. 659). Statistically, the importance of diabetes education is evidenced by the following data: the results of the 2002 Diabetes Prevention Program research demonstrated that people who were at increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes who somehow changed their lifestyles significantly reduced their risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes (by 58%). Also, it was estimated that around 10 million U.S. citizens who are at a high risk for that type of diabetes are likely to significantly decrease their chances of developing it (and thus reduce hospitality, mortality, and adverse effects rates) by doing exercises and following a particular diet (Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group, 2002). In this context, the need to enhance nurses’ education is perceived as critical. This statement is well supported by the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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