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Catholic and Christian - Book Report/Review Example

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Catholic and Christian: An Explanation of Commonly Misunderstood Catholic Beliefswritten by Dr. Alan Schreck is an invaluable book for anyone, who wants to explore the depths of Catholic and Christian faith. The author Dr. Alan Schreck is an associate professor of theology in one of Ohio's universities…
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Download file to see previous pages A very clear explanation Schreck (1984) makes with symbols. In the New Testament, the Greek word "estin" might mean "really" or "figuratively" what Jesus says: This is my body. Does this really this body, or it wine symbolizes blood and bread his body Catholics understand this in reality, whereas the Christians truly believe that the bread and wine symbolize the body and blood of Jesus. John (Jn 6:51-57) says that Jesus really expected his followers to eat his flesh and drink his blood and that many people will reject this teaching and because of that will refuse to follow him. Schreck (1984) interprets that John really meant that we should eat and drink from the real body of Christ (Jn 6:60-64). Early Christians were accused of practicing cannibalism. They say that the consumption is not real, but symbolic. Another important fact to note is that John and Paul are narrating Jesus's words, so we might only guess what Jesus actually meant - figuratively, or literally. "Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you; he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. (Jn 6:53-54).
Catholics do not worship the "host" (wine and bread), they worship Jesus Christ, who they believe is present in the host. The argument is "what if bread symbolizes Jesus's body why not worship it In the Catholic Mass, it is never taught that Jesus could be "re-sacrificed". Jesus Christ was sacrificed only once, but in the mercy of God and through the Mass people are allowed to enter into the faith and sacrifice him again. Catholics believe that this is feasible, because Jesus is "the same yesterday, today and forever' (Heb 13:8). Catholics consider this a serious argument not to participate in communion ceremonies in other Christian churches or to permit other Christians to obtain the Eucharist in a Catholic Church. What is more, Catholics believe that priests and bishops are given the power of Eucharistic celebration through Jesus Christ. However, this concept of apostolic succession is not discovered anywhere under the New Covenant and the only trace of priesthood is in Revelation 1:6,5:10, 20:6, which speaks of a priesthood of all believers.
One of the misunderstandings is connected with Mary. Catholics do not worship her. They honor her and love her, but do not worship her. Schreck (1984) comments that the Catholic Church is the only church that could be studies back to the time of Jesus. Protestant Churches emerged from the Reformation period, which started with the Lutherans in 1517.

Currently, there are 33 different denominations in Protestantism. Implicitly the author says that the Protestant church started 1500 years after Christ, whereas the Catholic one is historically the first church. Schreck (1984) says that early Christianity followed Catholic beliefs, for example St.Ingatius of Antioch. This is recorded in 110 AD when he defends the substantial presence of Jesus in the Eucharist.
In Heb 10:25 believers are warned against forgetting or failing to meet together and worship Jesus. Catholic Church today constantly encourages its followers in the requirement to come together on Sunday to community service and to worship together. Dr. Alan Shreck's (1984) investigates and explains the origins of the Catholic faith and the fullness of the Truth, which is in ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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