Nobody downloaded yet

The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression - Research Paper Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The paper describes the Harlem Renaissance that is best remembered today as an explosion of creativity bursting from the talented minds of African-Americans in the 1920s, although in reality, it was the locus for the radicalization and politicization of a disenfranchised populace…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.7% of users find it useful
The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression"

Download file to see previous pages During the early 20th century, three-quarters of a million African-Americans escaped the economic deprivation of the South and migrated northward to urban cities in a desperate attempt to find good jobs and economic security and also searching for a more racially tolerant society. 175,000 of these African-Americans settled in New York City (Wintz 15). To attach a stark beginning to the Harlem Renaissance by singling out one particular text is an exercise in futility and bound to spur debate. Black writers had been published since the 19th century, but the differentiation that makes the Harlem Renaissance easily definable as a turning point was the breadth of topics that black writers covered. The true origins of the Renaissance lay not in any single work that ignited a revolution, but in the various and multiple congregations of shared interests by those desiring to propagate the stunning burst of creativity through the publication of literary magazines and books. This collective urge to help one another was a primal element in turning the movement from a purely literary one into one that embraced all the fine arts; it was also integral in turning the Harlem Renaissance into a search for a new identity for an ethnic group previously defined by the centuries of slavery. Although the artists created vital and lasting works of literature, art and music, the Harlem Renaissance quickly became just as important for the way in which is given African-Americans a real culture and a pride in acknowledging and embracing that culture. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression Research Paper”, n.d.)
The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression Research Paper. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/history/1525496-the-harlem-renaissance-essay
(The Harlem Renaissance: The Future of Artistic Expression Research Paper)
The Harlem Renaissance: The Future of Artistic Expression Research Paper. https://studentshare.org/history/1525496-the-harlem-renaissance-essay.
“The Harlem Renaissance: The Future of Artistic Expression Research Paper”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/history/1525496-the-harlem-renaissance-essay.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression

Harlem Renaissance

...-American culture and art of this movement appealed to a mixed audience, making it easy to be adopted. It therefore follows, that it may not be accurate to credit the African cultural heritage and identity as the sole basis for African liberation (Sklar, 1972). There is another reason as to why the Harlem Renaissance cannot be considered as a purely African effort. Even though the African writers made a great deal of efforts in writing novels, plays, poetry and even music, they depended on the publishing houses or magazines that were owned by the whites to publish their works (Lewis, 1995). The major achievement of the Harlem Renaissance is regarded as the ability of the Africans to see their artistic and literary works through... ? The role...
15 Pages(3750 words)Research Paper

Harlem Renaissance

...and without debate. The future of the “New Negro” was one of these aspects. Harlem Renaissance intellectuals and artists echoed American progressivism in its belief in democratic reform as well as in its hardly uncritical belief in its future and in itself. Such a progressivist Weltanschauung made African-American intellectuals as their White counterparts being absolutely unprepared for the shock of Great Depression so the Harlem Renaissance ended unexpectedly due to the naive assumptions about predominance of culture over social and economic realities. Works Cited Bean, Annemarie. A Sourcebook on African-American...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

..., Alain Locke, a professor of philosophy at Howard University at that time. The movement blossomed in 1920s, particularly in the year 1925, when there had been a flood of literary articles and different artistic performances by the African Americans, who drew attention of white intellects to their culture and their participation as active and beneficial members of the society2. The Harlem Renaissance was indeed a blossoming time for the African American culture, particularly in the field of creative arts. It was considered to be a literary movement which laid the basis for all later African American literature and had noteworthy impacts on the overall black literature. Many famous names...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

...of old traditions of blacks’ culture, which had been reviving during this period. However, it was impossible for the movement not to be influenced by trends that were popular at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus the Harlem Renaissance was influenced by primitivism that was very popular among white artists. Actually, this trend that was based of Freudian theory of people’s primitive desires, was very close for African Americans as they had been considered as “primitive race” for ages. This made them look into the roots of their culture, where it was possible to find many elements of primitivism. Due to the fact that primitivism was very popular among whites, it helped create a new...
4 Pages(1000 words)Research Paper

Harlem Renaissance

...Essay, English Literature ic and Modern) Topic: Harlem Renaissance Harlem Renaissance is theportrayal of cultural identity of the black community in America, mainly through literature and other artistic forms. A new and distinct color line is demarcated when mention is made about this movement that goes through significant political, social and literary upheavals. Impacted by the technological advancement and education, a new black generation is getting ready to assert itself in every segment of human activity. Among the black intellectuals, writers and poets, several voices are being heard, not always agreeing with each other, but growing like octopus...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

..., artistic and political movement. It brought to the forefront the cultural specifics of the black community in all possible spheres. In literature, Harlem Renaissance enriched poetry, fiction, drama and essay. In arts, the traditional and popular songs, dance forms and paintings exhibit a vibrancy characteristic of the Harlem spirit of the times. And politically, the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) has brought the revolutionary ideas of W.E.B Du Bois and Marcus Garvey to good effect, which eventually led to appropriate representations and fortifications of the black...
11 Pages(2750 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

...Harlem Renaissance Historical Overview By the end of the first decade of the twentieth century Harlem in Manhattan, New York had become a prosperousblack middle class neighborhood, stemming from the economic elevation of many thousand African-Americans. This rise in economic status brought about a sense of self-confidence that was erstwhile lacking among the African Americans, and could well be said to be the nascent period of the Harlem Renaissance. However, it was the start of the First World War in 1914 that was instrumental in the Harlem Renaissance becoming the focus of the expression of the African...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

...movement which later became known as the Harlem Renaissance. The cultural movement was viewed and realized by the political activists, artists, musicians, and cultural elite, all of them having a longer term vision for the future (Powell). The painting that I have chosen to discuss is the Jeunesse, made by Palmer Hayden using water color. It is the collection of Dr Meredith F Sirmans and it shows the enthusiasm of the jazz, which is a musical form developed during 1920’s by the African Americans and also inclined towards the European form of art of the harmonic structure and the complex African rhythm culture. Jazz is usually identified by its blue rhythms and...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Harlem Renaissance

... Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance, which blossoms in American African culture, mostly in creative arts and it is among the influential movements in American African literary history. Accepting musical, literary, visual arts and theatrical participants hunts to reconceptualize blacks in America apart from white stereotypes who influence black people’s association to each other and their heritage. These Negros require loosening bourgeois shame and moral values about phases of their lives which may reinforce the beliefs of racists as perceived by whites. The movement has never been dominated by one notion but has been characterized by powerful debate. It has also opened for future blacks and has a big impact on succeeding... it was...
1 Pages(250 words)Article

Harlem Renaissance

...The Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance, also known as the New Negro movement, came as literacy, cultural, artistic, and intellectual movement that began at the foot of Harlem, in New York. This was a time after WWI and this wind of change went up to the time of the Great Depression1. The black community in America staged one of the biggest movements that remain in the annals of American history. Historians point out that the cause of this movement was because the black community was protesting for civil rights for the African Americans. Consequently, they received a better life in New York, and this gave them an impetus hence...
9 Pages(2250 words)Research Paper
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Research Paper on topic The Harlem Renaissance: the Future of Artistic Expression for FREE!

Contact Us