The Ku Klux Klan: American Terrorists - Research Paper Example

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This research paper explores a very sensitive issue in American history - the Ku Klux Klan. While Americans condemn contemporary terrorists, they should remember that the KKK committed hundreds of acts of domestic terrorism with little public resistance over a hundred year period…
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The Ku Klux Klan: American Terrorists
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Download file to see previous pages Their sense of right and wrong, questionable at best to begin with, is appeased due to this flawed reasoning. The KKK is but one of the right wing white supremacy groups in the U.S. but it is the most well known, is more organized with local and national chapters and has a higher membership than any other similar type hate group. The estimated 5000 total current Klan members are divided into about 100 chapters nationwide. Klan terrorist activities subsided to a great extent following the 1960’s civil rights era and the organization seemed to be doomed to extinction. However, interest in the KKK has recently experienced a resurgence emanating from the national attention given to the illegal immigration issue. In the last few years, the Klan has made every effort to incite Americans to resist what they deem as ‘assaults’ on Christian values such as gay marriage and crime but particularly has focused on immigration. “The Ku Klux Klan, which just a few years ago seemed static or even moribund… experienced a surprising and troubling resurgence…due to the successful exploitation of hot-button issues including immigration, gay marriage and urban crime” (ADL). The KKK began in Pulaski, Tennessee as a social group formed by veterans of the Confederate Army in 1866. The newly created organization held public parades through several towns but was generally laughed at and loudly jeered by onlookers. It wasn’t long before this ‘social group’ started using whips and guns to emphasize its ideological viewpoint. Though a few local politicians denounced the Klan’s violent activities, they were the minority. What made the KKK strong and enduring during the late 1860’s was the significant number of political and police officials, ministers,...
This paper gives an insight into the Ku Klux Klan as a terrorist organization. The KKK began in Pulaski, Tennessee as a social group formed by veterans of the Confederate Army in 1866. The newly created organization held public parades through several towns but was generally laughed at and loudly jeered by onlookers. It wasn’t long before this ‘social group’ started using whips and guns to emphasize its ideological viewpoint. Though a few local politicians denounced the Klan’s violent activities, they were the minority. What made the KKK strong and enduring during the late 1860’s was the significant number of political and police officials, ministers, newspaper editors, and ex-Confederate soldiers who hid beneath the white hooded robes of the Klan on night raids but appeared as respectable citizens during the day. By 1868, the Klan was becoming infamous for lynching (hanging), flogging, mutilations and general mayhem perpetrated on blacks and white sympathizers to the newly freed slave’s condition in the racist society of the South. The KKK, in essence, went underground by the beginning of 1870 because of pressure applied by several city officials and state legislatures across both the North and South who passed strict laws against the Klan. Martial law was declared in a few counties that were dominated by the Klan while law officials aggressively pursued high-ranking members. Soon after, the federal government took steps to reign-in the now clandestine Klan’s reign of terror. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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