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Clinical and Metabolic Consequences of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes - Term Paper Example

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The paper "Clinical and Metabolic Consequences of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes" considers the biochemical factors to the acquisition of chronic endocrine disease - insulin-resistant or insulin-dependent diabetes - and tied metabolic syndrome, pathologies of nerves, blood vessels, organs, and tissues…
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Clinical and Metabolic Consequences of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes
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Download file to see previous pages Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, which is responsible for uptake of insulin into the tissues. It also assists in lowering hepatic glucose production, by which plasma glucose levels are reduced. Any deficiency in the availability of insulin for this homeostatic function can lead to dire consequences in the human body including chronic disease from the improper metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Diabetes Mellitus is the name of the chronic disease given to the deficiency in the availability of insulin. It is classified into two. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a catabolic disorder in which the insulin availability is very low or absent, which is caused by the destruction of the beta cells and presents at younger ages, usually before the age of forty years (Hussain & Vincent, 2007). In genetically prone individuals the insulin-producing beta cells immune-mediated destruction of the beta cells occurs leading to absence or very low availability of insulin and the disease Type-1 diabetes (Gandhi et al, 2008). Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on the other hand is a progressive disease that results from a set of complex metabolic disorders originating from coexisting defects in multiple organ sites that include insulin resistance in muscle and adipose tissue, gradually reducing pancreatic insulin secretion, lack of regulation in hepatic glucose production, inappropriate glucagons secretion and reduced production of gastrointestinal incretins (Barr, Myslinski & Scarborough, 2008). ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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