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A Significant Role of Hip-Hop Culture - Term Paper Example

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The paper 'A Significant Role of Hip-Hop Culture' focuses on hip hop which seems to have entrenched popular culture in an unprecedented trend. This results from its appeal to many individuals across diverse populations, and despite originating from the black youth addressing their world views…
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A Significant Role of Hip-Hop Culture
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Download file to see previous pages Hip hop culture is considered to be important in cementing ethnic relations across the divide. On the same note, this music genre also provides an avenue to challenge the establishment or status quo in a number of ways and has played a role in unifying individuals and in particular, the youth across the divide (Gooden 70). This paper examines how hip hop culture emerged, its popularity and potential, mending the ethnic differences and other challenges that affect society.
Hip hop started in the 70s and was mainly common in places such as houses and the alleys of New York streets. The particular region that hip hop began is known as South Bronx in New York City and the term rap is often used interchangeably with hip hop; however, hip hop also entails the practices by an entire subculture. The originator of the term hip hop is Keith Cowboy who is associated with Grandmaster Flash and also the Furious Five. However, this term was used when hip hop then was regarded as disco rap. Cowboy invented the name while teasing a colleague who had been conscripted to the U.S. Army. The term hip hop seemed to copy the sound created when soldiers are matching (Gooden 71).
Hip hop gained prominence during the 70s and at a period when block parties were popular across New York City. This was more so evident in the Bronx because of a large population of African Americans and Puerto Ricans. The block parties mainly enlisted the services of a DJ who entertained party-goers with music such as funk or soul. As a result of a welcome, the DJs introduced percussion breaks for songs that were popular. To spice the songs, MCs began to explore with brief rhymes that denoted a sexual or scatological theme as a way of differentiating themselves and entertaining the revelers. Hip hop during this period, engaged mostly gang collaborations that included, for example, Universal Zulu Nation. This music derived its influence from disco and a backlash of the same. ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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