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Aging, Death, and Love in Shakespeares That Time of Year - Book Report/Review Example

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In the paper “Aging, Death, and Love in Shakespeare’s That Time of Year” the author discusses the subject of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73, which is the physical aging of the human body and the figurative aging of the mind that go against everlasting love…
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Aging, Death, and Love in Shakespeares That Time of Year
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Download file to see previous pages The phrase “boughs” that “shake against the cold” (Shakespeare 2) is an image that looks like the shaking limbs of an old person, while the bough may be a phallic symbol for a man. To express the emotions of the speaker, Shakespeare uses the metaphor of birds and choirs. The speaker feels nostalgic and sad. The “bare ruined choirs” (Shakespeare 4) refer to chairs that choir members have frequently used, so they looked damaged already (“Sonnet 73”). The speaker compares himself to something that has been used for a long time. Furthermore, the speaker feels the tension between him and nature. Nature says that he must age, but he does not want to get old yet. His aging is both figurative and literal, as he refers to line 5: “In me, thou seest the twilight of such day.” The speaker tells his audience that he is declining inside also. He could feel that he is losing his youthful abilities too (“Sonnet 73”). The speaker feels sad that he is raging outside and inside.
Despite his literal and figurative aging, the speaker emphasizes his love for his audience, which grows stronger as he grows weaker. The speaker could be speaking to a friend or a lover, someone close to his heart. This can be inferred when the speaker says: “This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong” (Shakespeare 13). He describes his passing youth and how his audience will react to it with stronger love. Furthermore, the third quatrain illustrates that the speaker is aging, but his love remains strong and fighting. The speaker says: “In me, thou seest the glowing of such fire” (Shakespeare 9). The fire of his love remains strong.  ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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