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The American Constitution
The American Constitution
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Constitution: The creation of our country Introduction On May 25, 1787, newly stretched dirtsheltered the cobblestone street in frontage of the Pennsylvania State House, shielding the men in the interior from the resonance of transient carriages and carts. Guards stood at the gateways to make certain that the inquisitive were kept back at a space. Robert Morris from Pennsylvania, the "investor" of the Revolution, began the events with a nomenclature--Gen. George Washington for the presidency of the Constitutional Convention. The vote was undoubtedly unanimous. With distinctive traditional humility, Washington articulated his discomfiture at his lack of qualifications to be in charge over such an...
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Hamilton summary
Hamilton summary
1 pages (250 words)
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... Hamilton Summary Union is very important for the safety and happiness of the American peoples. It serves as the sacred bond that ties the people of America together (Hamilton, 295). However, the present confederation is not sufficient to preserve the union. There are various indicators that the federation has failed. The insufficiency is exposed by the fact that there are debts owed to foreigners and to the local citizens (Hamilton, 295). In addition, the possession of the country’s territories and vital posts by foreigners, and the inability of the country to repel foreign aggressions, add to the insufficiency of the confederation (Hamilton, 297). The country has not been able to maintain commerce...
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Reading Respond
Reading Respond
1 pages (250 words)
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... Lecturer Political Science In my opinion, to be represented is to have someone to speak on your behalf. Meaning, instead of airing your grievances or expressing your opinions, you look for another person to do it on your behalf. This job has been perfectly executed by the congress because, since its establishment, it has managed to gather representatives to speak for the interests of the whole nation (Ball 213). Through the use of a few legislators, all the people from different parts of the country have been represented. Thus, they can indirectly participate in the decision-making process. In support for my stance, I would like to argue in favor of the federalist arguments. As they asserted, the est...
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The History and Meaning of the ninth Amendment of U.S Constitution
The History and Meaning of the ninth Amendment of U.S Constitution
3 pages (750 words)
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... The history and meaning of the Ninth Amendment of U.S Constitution The major argument against the Bill of rights in the US constitution was that specifying rights which the government could not violate gave the implication that the government could violate the rights that are not protected by the constitution. Therefore, the purpose of the Ninth amendment was to address this issue. The Ninth Amendment provides that the enumeration of certain rights in the constitution shall not be interpreted to exclude other rights retained by the people. The Ninth amendment is seldom referenced because the language does not provide clues as to the nature of rights that it is meant to protect. However, the history ...
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HISTORIC ESSAY
HISTORIC ESSAY
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Articles of Confederation and the Constitution: A Comparative Analysis During the period from 1774 through 1789, the 13Colonies of England in the new world overthrew the control of England in a violent revolution and formed a new nation, the United States of America. The foundational document1 of the new nation was the Declaration of Independence, authored by Thomas Jefferson. Recognizing the need for a formal organization of the fledgling nation, proposals for Articles of Confederation were submitted to the Continental Congress only eight days following the signing of the Declaration of Independence. (Thomson, 1837) The Continental Congress debated the issues for more than a year before finally...
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The Effect Of Hamiltonian And Jeffersonian Political Philosophy On The Development Of American Political Attitudes Between 1790 And 1860
The Effect Of Hamiltonian And Jeffersonian Political Philosophy On The Development Of American Political Attitudes Between 1790 And 1860
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1
... The effect of Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian political philosophy on the development of American political attitudes between 1790 and 1860 Introduction In the history of America’s development, there are two key political figured referred to as the core of the nation’s political division: Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. The philosophies and political ideas of these two philosophers inspired several political actions in essential events during our great nation’s birth in the 1820s. On the side of Hamilton, the government was supposed to address people matters meaning that there should be the establishment of federal law controlling the states and focusing on financial gain. On the other hand,...
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Supreme court cases and the concept of Federalism. How they relate to the Federalists 10, 46 or 78 arguments
Supreme court cases and the concept of Federalism. How they relate to the Federalists 10, 46 or 78 arguments
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Last Number 23 November Supreme Court Cases and the Concept of Federalism. How they relate to the Federalists 10, 46 or 78 Arguments. INTRODUCTION Laws are regarded as a set of rules and regulations that guide the activities conduct by an individual in a specific society. Federalism is such a governmental system, which represents the involvement of two different governmental levels in the context of protecting the interests of the citizens. Thus, the concept of federalism reveals that the distinct governmental powers possess the powers to enforce legal provisions in different scenarios (DeLorenzo, “Federalism in U.S. Government”). THESIS STATEMENT Based on the above context, the assignment intends...
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The Formation Of The US Constitution or The Shaded US Constitution
The Formation Of The US Constitution or The Shaded US Constitution
11 pages (2750 words)
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... FORMATION OF THE US CONSTITUTION – A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FEDERALIST VIEWS THAT SHAPED THE US CONSTITUTION Contents Introduction 3 Basic Structure US Constitution 3 Background of Constitutional Framing 4 Divergent Views 5 Choice of Federal Constitution – The Federalist Papers 6 Devolution of Power to Smaller Government Authorities 7 Maintaining a Balance 8 Minimizing the Risks of Monarchy by Government Counter-Balance 9 Inclusion of All Men in Governance 10 Transparency and the Elimination of Anarchy by Keeping Citizens Informed 10 Conclusion 11 Bibliography 13 Introduction The United States is ran by a federalist constitution that is structured to have a federal system that runs alo...
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The Two Dominant Political Parties in the United States of America
The Two Dominant Political Parties in the United States of America
1 pages (250 words)
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... 1110-08F-2, AMERICAN HISTORY I (HY1110-08F-2) The Republicans and the Federalists were the two dominant political parties in the United s of America. They have many differences in terms of policies, ideologies, and other aspects. The Federalist was composed mostly of merchants and those in the upper class. They were rich and were popular in territories where trades and big businesses abounded. In contrast, the Republican was made up of debtors and low-income people like the farmers and laborers. They influenced only the places populated mostly by farmers. Federalists interpreted the Constitution loosely to establish a central government in terms of military and fiscal powers because they believed...
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Ratification of constitution as a result of competing economic interests
Ratification of constitution as a result of competing economic interests
3 pages (750 words)
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... Ratification of Constitution as a Result of Competing Economic Interests Ratification of Constitution as a Result of Competing Economic Interests The constitution of the United States, for over 200 years has served as the major foundation for United States government. Economic interests, Personal interests, constituents’ and other interests played major role in the process of drafting the constitution. The U.S. constitution was created in the year 1787 at the constitutional convention held in Philadelphia (Foner, 2012). It establishes the fundamental principles of a national government that helps in joining the state in an effective political union. The constitution of the United States serves as an ...
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American Political Parties
American Political Parties
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Jeffersonian Democrats America at its founding had no parties but factions. One faction favored the draftconstitution (federalists) and the other opposed (anti-federalists). George Washington a federalist assumed power in 1789 with John Adams as vice president. Alexander Hamilton became secretary of treasury, and Thomas Jefferson secretary of state. However, Jefferson and James Madison were opposed to Hamilton’s economic program of strong central government, assumption of state debts by federal government, National Bank of US and enactment of whiskey tax (Maisel 28). In 1791, divisions began to grow as Madison urged Jefferson to join him in organizing against Hamilton leading to formation of the Dem...
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Immigration Reform
Immigration Reform
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Reform Insert Insert Insert March 2, I. Introduction a) Summarize policy reform debate briefly Policy reform debate on boundaries is an ongoing debate in the United States since 9/ 11 terrorist attacks. It is based on realignment of the US immigration system and national security enforcement. The expansion of immigration policy is the major goal of the whole debate where new enforcement measures are considered as the ultimate achievements of the debate. Basic new laws on immigration controls are focused upon legislature’s aggressiveness on enforcement. It is meant to meet the needs of the ever-growing population of the immigrant families that represent one in four people in the states (Batalova and...
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Revolutionary Characters by Gordon S Wood
Revolutionary Characters by Gordon S Wood
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1
... S. Wood. Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different? New York: Penguin Books. 2007. Xiii + 336 pp. This paper presents an academic book review of the above mentioned book Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different? by Gordon S. Wood. Wood, in this book, sheds light on the six revolutionary leaders in the course of American history, whose contributions greatly changed the landscape of the modern world to such an extent that they may be called the founding leaders of the modern day American political system. Wood brings the life of these men into focus and retells a story from their perspective. In the opening paragraphs of the book, Wood comments that life in modern...
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Values of American political thought
Values of American political thought
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Topic: Lecturer: Presentation: Source of Political ity The American government derives its power from the people in form of a constitution which ensures checks and balances. America was a British colony and therefore subjected to the English law and constitution and is a monarchy form of a government ruled by hereditary kings. In such form of government, the will of the king is the law of the land hence the people are subject to oppression (Paine). The pilgrims from Britain thus found a colony in America and settled in the northern parts of Virginia and signed the mayflower compact on 11 November, 1620 to “preserve order and further their aims” (Mount). They thus created laws and constitutions and...
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The First Great Compromise in US History
The First Great Compromise in US History
8 pages (2000 words)
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... First Great Compromise in US History People referred to the proposal by small states as the New Jersey Plan because the proposal came from William Peterson from New Jersey. The initial draft kept in place making features of the, then government. It retained one Congress, but with additional powers to regulate trade and raise taxes. Delegates from small states ensured that they maintain one vote for each of them without considering the population of the state. The refusal by small states to reject the Virginia Plan because large-state delegates did not agree with their plan almost plunged the Constitutional Convention into a deadlock. The answer to the deadlock came from Roger Sherman, a delegate fro...
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Federalists and Republicans
Federalists and Republicans
2 pages (500 words)
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... Federalists Vs. The Republicans No debate in American history has been as lasting or has sparked more controversy than the issue of Federalism. In the conflict between Republicanism and Federalism there was the similarity that each believed in a central federal government. However, the Republicans believed more power should reside in the states and that they should exercise control over many of government's functions. The Federalists believed that most of the authority should reside in the central federal government. This laid the foundation for the debates between the elite insiders versus the common man, and the seat of the ultimate rule of law. These views are expressed in many of the Acts,...
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Federalism Paper
Federalism Paper
3 pages (750 words)
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... Paper Federalism is a concept where powers are shared by two or more governments in a same country. United s is said to be a federalist country because it has two power bodies. One is the central government which is for the country as a whole while another is the state government which is different for every state in the United States. Though there are some powers which are with the central government only, such as money printing, war declaration, defense strategies and immigration policies. The other powers and policies which are related to run the state are completely under the state government (Longley, 2013). People have different and varied opinions about federalism but for United States it com...
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American Revolution in 1775-1783
American Revolution in 1775-1783
6 pages (1500 words)
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... 7 General Topics During the American Revolution (1775-1783), America faced several challenges, particularly problems with its armed forces, ineffective government, poor economic conditions, and diplomatic concerns. The American armed forces, compared to the British troops, lacked experience, training, and resources. The Americans also experienced morale problems, especially when facing hunger, diseases, and cold environments. Enlistments were not high enough to ensure a steady supply of troops, and AWOLs, or absence without leave, increased too, thereby further reducing human resources for the war. The young government could hardly work effectively too, because the British had bottled up...
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Establish the topic from the paper
Establish the topic from the paper
5 pages (1250 words)
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... s John Locke’s Political Philosophy In his 1689 work “Two Treatises of Government” philosopher John Locke expounded his political theory of liberalism. In the first treatise Locke criticized the doctrine of the Divine Right of Kings. He argued that the monarchs of his time were not the heirs of the biblical Adam; and even if they were they would enjoy unlimited authority. He concluded that absolute, hereditary monarchy is an unjust and groundless system and must, therefore, be abandoned. In the second treatise Locke presented his ideas of the nature, function, authority and origin of government, as well as the roles of its various branches. Locke began the second treatise with his analysis of the...
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Partisan Politics
Partisan Politics
3 pages (750 words)
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... Federalist View on the Role of Government The Federalist View on the Role of Government In the late eighteenth century parties developed gradually after the inauguration of the federal government in the United States which gave rise to persistent divisions among the officeholders. This was mainly because there were questions on the extent of the new government’s powers and authority. There were no proper structures on the powers and jurisdiction of the national and state government which led to conflicts. This was finally revealed in 1791 when the debate over the establishment of the Bank of United States showed the huge difference in the ideas and opinions about the balance of power state and...
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Mid 2
Mid 2
6 pages (1500 words)
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... ONE: Confederation and Federalist Republic: Tell me why the Articles of Confederation had to be replaced with a new federal constitution? What compromises were necessary to create and ratify the Constitution? What critical roles did Washington and Hamilton play in making the new federal government work? What issues soon divided Americans into Hamiltonian Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans? Why was John Adams a one-term president and the 1800 election so important? The Articles of Confederation were brought in for the new United States after the revolution, but had several problems that meant that they were swiftly replaced by the new federal constitution. Firstly, the Articles had no...
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History and Political Science
History and Political Science
4 pages (1000 words)
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... History and Political Science What led to the rise of the first two-party system? How did reality challenge the visions of the first party leaders? Political scientists and historians used the first party system to explain the political systems that existed in the US between 1792 and 1824. There were two national parties, the Federalist Party and the Democratic - Republican Party that dominated the political arena. The two parties competed for the various elective positions of the presidency, congress and the states. The republicans dominated after the 1800 while the federalist was dominant up to 1800 (Brands et al 273-276). These two parties rose from the national politics before expanding to gain...
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Hamilton Federalists 16
Hamilton Federalists 16
4 pages (1000 words)
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... HAMILTON FEDERALISTS 16 The federalists’ wrote a total of 85 articles that promoted the approval of the U.S constitution.The 85 essays were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay with Alexander writing 51 essays, Madison 26 and jays writing 5 articles, the rest were a partnership between Madison and Hamilton. The Hamilton 16 was a 2nd part in the essays that argue that the federal laws should apply to the people and not just the states. Hamilton addresses the need for the federal government to legislate directly over the people of the United States. I agree with Hamilton on the Government having control on the activities of the people. By so doing the government not only controls...
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Article the First
Article the First
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Article the First: The Federalist and Antifederalist Perspective Federalists’ Support for Article the First Ever since the United States attained her independence in the 18th century, the nation has had to grapple with numerous constitutional amendments, some of which were controversial, while others underwent ratification through a popular vote (Publishing & Duignan, 2013). Although many of the constitutional amendments passes by the congress formed the bill of rights in the United States constitution, some were not very successful in the process. This was especially so in the year 1789 on June 8 when one Virginia 5th District congressional representative agitated the congress to consider passing...
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How do we end gridlock in the American political System and modernize the federal Governments administrative infrastructure t
How do we end gridlock in the American political System and modernize the federal Government's administrative infrastructure t
20 pages (5000 words)
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... The Modern Anti-Federalist Critique Reclaiming the Ideals of Civil Liberty and Rebuilding American Democracy Submitted By 05/07 Abstract The Anti-Federalists in American history opposed aspects of the U.S. Constitution that they believed that would lead to centralized power, representation of minority interests over popular will, corruption and tyranny in government over the natural rights of citizens. A compromise in was reached in the negotiation the fundamental social contract of the nation. The ‘Founding Fathers’ agreed to support the Constitution as it is structured in the Articles of Organization only if the 10 Amendments subsequently known as the “Bill of Rights” were included in the...
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Goverment politics
Goverment politics
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Federalist Papers, through its motivations, is an ingenious public relations campaign, designed to elicit support for the ratification of the then-proposed Constitution. One of the governing principles of the dissertation is the need for governance that runs along the concept of republicanism, which, at that time, was being drafted in the Constitution. Under a union, the then-thirteen states will be compacted and consolidated under a central government, without removing the sovereignty in rule and authority that was currently enjoyed by the individual states. Since the concept was relatively new, it required quite a hefty effort to convince the states to join the union, most especially that it was...
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Immigration Reform
Immigration Reform
8 pages (2000 words)
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... Immigration Reform U.S global competitiveness is a question that has been nagging to policymakers and think tanks given that the issue of immigration reform touches on the economic stability of the nation. Apparently, US have realized that it attracts, and host so many immigrants who sometimes fail to report to their countries or seek extension of their visas after expiry. These issues have drawn debate over the future of United States following immigration Reforms. Many leaders have given their opinions regarding the immigration reform process focusing on its implication to the future of the United States. For instance, the statement made by President Barrack Obama gave a clear indication that...
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Debate between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists
Debate between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists
2 pages (500 words)
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... the delegates at Philadelphia produced the Constitution, ratification was far from assured. While many saw the need for an organized, democratic national government, many people that remembered British tyranny were against the formation of such an institution. This led to the division into two separate groups in support of and opposed to the Constitution, known as the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, respectively. While each side had strong arguments to support their positions, the Anti-Federalists proved the most idealistic and democratic, though the leadership of the Federalists would prove too effective to overcome. The formation of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists seemed inevitable fr...
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Presidential Election of 1796
Presidential Election of 1796
2 pages (500 words)
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... Presidential Election of 1796 It is interesting that this is the election that we were assigned because I esteem it to be the first actual election that laid the groundwork for our electoral system today. Unfortunately however, the men running are not of the same stock as yesterdays leaders. I believe that I would have voted for Adams. This is not to say that one candidate is a better man than the other but rather because I feel more comfortable backing a man with experience. Adams was one of our founding fathers. It is difficult to imagine the amount of self conviction and intense loyalty to his ideals that this man must have possessed to support a break from England. The knowledge that his i...
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Immigration Reform Essay
Immigration Reform Essay
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Immigration Reform Immigration reform has been one of the most important as well as most debated issues in countries all over the world. However, the most important and most significant amount of debate has been raised in the United States of America. The country has been attacked many times by various terrorist groups and most of these times terrorists attacked the American people, in general, and the country, in particular, by immigrating into the country. Immigration reform policies are most essential to be implemented as these policies will not only provide the country and its citizens, greater amounts of support, but also raise the level of economic and social growth (Berkowitz et al., 19-21)....
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Were the Anti-Federalists Correct Was the 1787 Constitution a Betrayal of the American Revolution
Were the Anti-Federalists Correct Was the 1787 Constitution a Betrayal of the American Revolution
7 pages (1750 words)
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... History and Political Science 18 September Were the Anti-Federalists Correct? Was the 1787 Constitution a Betrayal of the American Revolution? Why or Why not? Why the Federalists’ Opposition was Correct The founding fathers of federalism for United States of America had great expectation and a desire for a functional government, to maintain order in the nation. The push and the predicted effects of the constitution however created opposing forces to the ratification of the U.S. constitution. The federalists strongly supported the constitution and its formation of the central government because the formerly relied confederation articles were ineffective, and a strong national government would be able ...
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History of the US before 1877
History of the US before 1877
5 pages (1250 words)
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... War of 1812: A Catalyst for Political Change When George Washington left his office as President of the United s, he left a few warnings regarding how the country should run. One of these bullet points was that we should not interfere or interact with any foreign nation. Specifically, this had been due to the American Revolution in that as a newly formed country, it was important that the United States maintain its sovereignty. However, the New World was full of resources and Great Britain was not happy about loosing such a lucrative and valuable overseas investment. There was also American interest to expand west, which was currently owned by Great Britain as well as blockades against America due...
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Why didnt the member states of the EU (European Union) simply create a United States of Europe after the Second World War
Why didn't the member states of the EU (European Union) simply create a United States of Europe after the Second World War
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Why didn't the member s of the EU (European Union) simply create a United s of Europe after the Second World War? The Second World War devastated Europe. Germany's militaristic expansion, destroyed whole nations and sentenced tens of millions to death. By the time the war had finished, much of the continent lay in ruins. How was Europe to rebuild? This was a question on many peoples' lips after 1945. Some thought a massive federalist state, similar to the United States was the solution. Europeans could pool their wealth and have a single government. That idea fizzled. There was still too much distrust in the immediate post-war period for a United States of Europe to be created. What Europe chose to...
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Answering Questons
Answering Questons
4 pages (1000 words)
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... BOOK REVIEW What was the political situation in New York immediately following the drafting of the Constitution? Why did ratification face such a struggle in that state? What political leaders and interest groups criticized or opposed the Constitution? Why? Political debates based on union matters engulfed the state of New York following the drafting of the new constitution. The antifederalists viewed the new constitution as a great threat to liberty – the constitution threatened to undermine the republican principles of government established by the revolution1. They were the major critics of the new federal system unless the constitution was amended before its ratification. They were more...
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Provide a comprehensive definition of Federalism and discuss its long evolution along with the manner in which it functions toda
Provide a comprehensive definition of Federalism and discuss its long evolution along with the manner in which it functions toda
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Federalism Federalism is defined as the division of government powers between the national and governments. In this sense, those in the governments cannot contradict the laws and the statutes formed by the national government and established within that particular government's constitution (Drake & Nelson). This means that there is a separation between independent powers but the national level has the ultimate say. Federalism is a large part of American history. Federalism is defined in the United States constitution and allows states to be their own individual branches of government. The states must abide by their own laws as long as the individual laws do not create conflict with foreign laws....
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Compare & Contrast John Adams to Thomas Jefferson
Compare & Contrast John Adams to Thomas Jefferson
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Adams and Thomas Jefferson John Adams (1735-1826) was the first Vice President and the second President of the United s of America. While his tenure as President was clouded with crisis and conflict, he is still remembered as a remarkable political philosopher. He played a key role in the negotiations during the drafting of the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776, and is regarded as one of the most influential Founder Fathers of the United States of America. After serving two terms as the Vice President, Adams again contested for the Presidency in 1796 as the official Presidential candidate of the Federalist Party. The Federalists elected Adams in order to contest Thomas Jefferson in ...
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Civil War
Civil War
1 pages (250 words) , Download 1
... According to the Portrait of America, the Civil War was a battle meant to preserve the Union i.e. the United s of America. The genesis began with the formulation of the constitution, where two divergent schools of thought emerged with regard to the functions of the federal hegemony. Federalist were inclined on the axiom of thinking that the centralized administration and the managerial required to uphold their power in order to affirm the very continued existence of the Union. On the extreme end the anti-federalist held the school of thought that states ought to maintain much of their self-government in the ranks of the free. Ideally they championed the theory where each state was to uphold the...
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Social Security
Social Security
7 pages (1750 words)
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... Social Security Comparative Analysis Paper: Mid Term I. Introduction: a) Summarize policy reform debate briefly. Social security can be described as an insurance program that accommodates the old, survivors and persons with disabilities. It is funded by a dedicated payroll tax from the citizens. Debates articulate this subject due to challenges with funding the program. In 2011, the pension plan over grew the stipulated budget by $1.6 trillion and a possible way out was to increase long term savings. Secondly, the current money transfer system is not rational where the elderly earn more money and they have pension income plans while the younger counter parts don’t earn enough and they lack pension...
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The United States Constitution and the debates over the merits of the constitution
The United States Constitution and the debates over the merits of the constitution
10 pages (2500 words)
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... This is an organization of a nation in such a way that there are two or more levels of government, where the governments have ity over the same people and regions. The federalism mode of government has been in the United States ever since the country gained independence and the founding fathers found a need to unite the vast country. They had several options among them and having a central government was just one of those options. However, a central government alone seemed very far from the people and listening and addressing the issues of the majority would have been hard for that type of the government.1 The presence of a central government simply meant that these individuals would obviously be fav...
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Reading Respond#3
Reading Respond#3
1 pages (250 words)
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... Reading Respond#3 Congress has comprehensible military ity of the purse and declaration of warand the President is clearly identified as the Commander-and-Chief (Straub 1-2). These constitutional statements are mutually exclusive and are defended within the U.S. Constitution as a check and balance mechanism (The Founders Constitution 1). The Constitution does preserve definite war authorities for the President in its capacity as the commander-in-chief (Straub 1-2). It is clearly stated that the President is the commander in chief for both the Army and Navy of the U.S, and of the armed forces of the numerous states, when given the actual service of America and commission all the service personnel of ...
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HIS 202
HIS 202
4 pages (1000 words)
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... The two documents; the constitutionality of the Bank of the United s, 1791 by Thomas Jefferson to Washington and document 5; Alexander Hamilton, Opinion on the constitutionality of the Bank was written in the same period, but with different authors. Thomas Jefferson happened to be the author of the constitutionality of the Bank of the United States which was written in 1791, and Alexander Hamilton was the author of opinions on the constitutionality of the Bank written in the same year. All the two documents were letters written to answer the request of Washington. In the two documents, Hamilton is seen to have drawn his arguments to Washington’s request much more deliberately than Thomas Jefferson...
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Marbury v. Madison
Marbury v. Madison
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Street Address ST ZIP e-mail phone fax Marbury Vs. Madison The Marbury vs. Madison case began in 1801. John Adams was retiring from office and had the opportunity to fill some new judgeships that had been created. It was his opportunity to put more Federalists in key positions before his departure from office. The newly appointed individuals received their commissions. But, a mistake was made and newly appointed Justice of the Peace William Marbury did not receive his commission. After John Adams left office and Thomas Jefferson took office Jefferson ordered James Madison to not allow any more Federalists to take office. In the confusion of changing from the Adams administration to the...
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The Issue of Virtue or Citizenship for the New Republic of Antarctica
The Issue of Virtue or Citizenship for the New Republic of Antarctica
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Issue of Virtue or Citizenship for the New Republic of Antarctica I am pleased, as the chief political consultant for the Committee to Establishthe New Republic of Antarctica (CENRA), to present my report regarding what role virtue or citizenship ought to play in maintaining the legitimacy of our fine republic. This report will begin by presenting a definition of virtue, alternative models which have incorporated the concept of citizenship differently, and a description as to how this notion of virtue functions in a system of government. Particular attention will be paid to the historical experiment known as "America", and the theoretical debate regarding the ideal nature of virtue. The report...
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Does the responsibility to protect satisfactorily address the moral and political dilemmas posed by humanitarian intervention consider with reference to various perspectives
Does the responsibility to protect satisfactorily address the moral and political dilemmas posed by humanitarian intervention consider with reference to various perspectives
1 pages (250 words)
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... to Protect and Dilemmas Posed by Humanitarian Intervention Responsibility to Protect The doctrine of responsibility to protect is the enabling principle that obligates the individual states and the international community to protect their citizens from war crimes, genocide, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing. The basis of the doctrine is the idea that the sovereignty is a responsibility and not a privilege. This doctrine may be viewed from three broad dimensions. That is prevention, reaction, and rebuilding (World Federalist Movement, 2001). Prevention dimension is the most important element of the responsibility to protect. In this case, effective prevention must look into the causes of t...
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Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1
... fortification of the new American nationalism was attributed to the governance of Andrew Jackson. During his term as the US president, Jackson defended the rights of the common people and empowered the common man. Jackson's critics, however, contend that Jackson showed inconsistencies in his policies with regard his view of the functions of the federal government and his duties as president. Yet, a close scrutiny of the Jacksonian type of democracy, as exemplified in the three documents, demonstrates that Jackson is consistent with his view of the role of the federal government and his obligations as President by asserting the 'faithful' execution of the laws to protect the federalist ideals...
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19th Century United States Presidential Elections
19th Century United States Presidential Elections
3 pages (750 words)
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... 19th Century United s Presidential Elections The 1800 United s presidential election is one of the most controversial in the history of United States and became a turning point in the making of the nation’s Constitution. The candidates in the said election were the incumbent President John Adams of the Federalist Party and his Vice President Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic - Republican Party. However, to make things more difficult, each party wants to have a President and a Vice President in the White House. Hence, each party nominated a second contender: Aaron Burr for the Democratic-Republicans and Charles Pickney for the Federalists. There are numerous issues considered by the electorate in...
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Hamiltons Views on Judicial Power
Hamiltons Views on Judicial Power
3 pages (750 words)
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... Hamilton's Views on Judicial Power This essay attempt to circumscribe the power of the court to act fromthe vantage point of Alexander Hamilton as expressed in The Federalist Paper No. 78, which states, inter alia: Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in capacity to annoy or injure them. (Hamilton, Federalist) The statement follows the fundamental American concept of government directly influenced by the French philosopher Montesquieu (1949 ...
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The Impact of Political Institutions
The Impact of Political Institutions
2 pages (500 words)
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... decision making in Scotland The United Kingdom has for centuries been controlled by the Parliament at Westminster (Calman Commission, 2009, p.4). From 1707 until 1999, Scotland did not make decisions on its own, unlike the states in the USA. Scottish members of Parliament were accountable to the British Parliament. However, since the devolution of power in 1999, Scottish Parliament makes independent decisions with regard to legislation and execution of domestic policies concerning Scotland and requiring Scottish expertise, resembling the US political structure. The Scottish Parliament has power to make laws, and Scottish Executive to execute them (Raco, 2003, p.75). The Scottish Parliament is compos...
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American Government Final Essay
American Government Final Essay
6 pages (1500 words)
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... necessary and proper clause, as represented by Article Section 8 of the United s Constitution, is a controversial topic for political commentators, Supreme Court justices, and lawmakers themselves, and has been so for hundreds of years (Engdahl, 2011). The significance of the so-called “elastic clause” rests in the distinction between enumerated and implied powers within the framework of the Constitution. Enumerated (or “delegated”) powers, as such, are those freedoms the Congress mentioned “in the first seventeen clauses in Section 8 of Article 1 (Gitelson, Dudley, & Dubnick, 2008, p. 43). Alternatively, “implied” powers are “those powers given to Congress by Article 1, Section 8, clause 18, of the ...
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Paper 2
Paper 2
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Order 749491 ENTER POLI 2151-477 November 15 Federalist no 10: James Madison James Madison, the of Federalist no 10, favours a large, national republic established by the constitution and governed by a handful of people. The elective representatives would be more patriotic (since they would have been nominated by a large number of people), more refined and enthusiastic in performing their tasks, keeping in mind the people whom they are representing. As we say “Majority is authority”, the majority cannot vote for bad or something not of worth. They would definitely be going for someone who could translate their interests and their thinking. The people should be divided into different interest sectors ...
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