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The Krebs Cycle And Its relationship to Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism & Acid base balance
The Krebs Cycle And Its relationship to Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism & Acid base balance
2 pages (500 words)
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... Krebs cycle and its relationship to Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism & Acid base balance All cells are required to generate energy for survival, be it a eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell. The process involved in the production of cellular energy was defined by Hans A. Krebs in the year 1937. He proposed that the production of cellular energy is association with a particular metabolic pathway in the cells. This is called the Krebs cycle or the citric acid cycle which defines the oxidation of carbohydrates in animal tissues. Consequent to this finding it was later found that the acetyl derivation (a compound produced during fat degradation) has identical properties to the compound produced when pyruvate...
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Haemoglobin plays a role in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Describe how this is accomplished at the molecular level. What happens to the relations
Haemoglobin plays a role in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Describe how this is accomplished at the molecular level. What happens to the relations
4 pages (1000 words) , Download 1
... of Hemoglobin Hemoglobin is one of the most important content of blood and helps in carrying oxygen to the tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs for expulsion. As the name indicates hemoglobin has two major parts the heme and globin, indicating that each subunit of hemoglobin is a globular protein with an embedded heme group. Each heme group contains an iron atom which is responsible for the binding of oxygen and each heme group is able to bind one oxygen molecule, and therefore one hemoglobin molecule can bind four oxygen molecules in humans. In order to understand the transportation of oxygen and carbon dioxide at a molecular level, it is important to understand the structure of...
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High altitude: effects on respiration and mountain sikness
High altitude: effects on respiration and mountain sikness
6 pages (1500 words)
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... head: EFFECTS OF HIGH ALTITUDE High altitude: effects on respiration and mountain sickness Highaltitude: effects on respiration and mountain sickness Before understanding the effects of high altitude on respiration and mountain sickness, it is essential to first understand what high altitude means. "Altitude is defined on the following scale High (8,000 - 12,000 feet [2,438 - 3,658 meters]), Very High (12,000 - 18,000 feet [3,658 - 5,487 meters]), and Extremely High (18,000+ feet [5,500+ meters])" (Curtis, 1995). As a person goes up a higher altitude, both barometric pressure and the partial pressure of oxygen decrease. According to Ward et al (1995), barometric pressure falls to approximately as low...
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Introduction of crude oil biodegrading by some marine bacteria and reduce sulphur component
Introduction of crude oil biodegrading by some marine bacteria and reduce sulphur component
1 pages (250 words)
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... The role of microorganisms in degradation of marine oil spills is being constantly investigated as the fate of petroleum compounds in marine environment depends on their transformation or degradation by microbes. More than hundred known species of bacteria and fungi play a role in the degradation of marine oil to usable components with the help of their enzymes (Patin, n.d). The hydrocarbons present in the petroleum products are effectively degraded by various Pseudomonas and Penicillum species (Cerniglia & Perry, 2007). The natural process of degradation of marine oil is time-consuming as a result extensive damage can occur to the marine organisms and indirectly upon humans when they consume such...
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Enzymatic Analysis of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Enzymatic Analysis of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase
3 pages (750 words)
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... Analysis of Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase s Experiments were conducted to elaborate the mechanisms involved in alcoholic fermentation of glucose by estimation of 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-y)-2,5-diphenylformazan (aka MTT formazan). This serves as an important marker for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Cellular lysates of baker’s yeast were prepared and used for fermentation reactions in cuvettes. The first experiment measured the effect of time on the recovery by stopping the reaction at intervals of 5 minutes. Maximal values of MTT formazan, at an absorbance of 570 nm were obtained at 15-30 minutes of the reaction initiation, which indicated maximum alcohol dehydrogenase activity. A similar...
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Effects tillage system, fertilization and crop protection practices on soil quality parameters
Effects tillage system, fertilization and crop protection practices on soil quality parameters
14 pages (3500 words)
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... Running head: Agriculture Effects of Tillage System, Fertilization, and Crop Protection Practices on Soil Quality Parameters Insert   Insert Grade Course Insert Tutor’s Name 12 June 2012 Table of Contents Table of Contents 0 1.0 Indicators of Soil Quality 2 1.1 Biological Indicators 2 1.1.1 Microbial Biomass 2 1.1.2 Soil Basal Respiration (SBR) 3 1.1.3 Metabolic Quotient (qCO2). 4 1.1.4 Potentially Mineralizable Nitrogen (Anaerobic) 5 1.2 Physical Indicators 7 1.2.1Soil Bulk Density 7 1.2.2 Water Holding Capacity 8 1.3 Chemical Indicators 9 1.3.1 Soil pH 9 1.3.2 Soil Organic Matter 10 1.4 Tillage System (Conventional and Organic) and Soil Quality 11 1.5 Management Effects and Indicators 13...
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Case studing (nursing science)
Case studing (nursing science)
3 pages (750 words)
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... Study (nursing science) This is a case of an athlete from Kenya, a 20 year old track star, arrives in Melbourne ahead of the commonwealth Games. He is in excellent health and has often run a mile in under 4 minutes. Having never won a major meeting event he is hoping to win a gold medal for his country while competing in Australia. The race day arrives and Kenneth prepares to start the 400m race by entering the race blocks. Before the start of the race, his cardiovascular activity is stressful--.Because he was excited and nervous at same time his cardiovascular activity is increasing. His heart rate is increasing as well as his breathe per minutes. At his age, excitement is very much increased and ...
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Summary
Summary
1 pages (250 words)
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... full Making Yeast more Tolerant at higher temperatures (article summary) 06 November The two articles on yeast fermentation and bio-fuel production are entitled “Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant” by Caspeta et al. and a second one is that of “Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast” by Lam et al. Both are published in October 3, 2014. The following summary is on the first research article that was written by Caspeta et al. The world is fast running out of fossil fuels, in particular, crude oil. There is a great need to find alternative fuels that are preferably non-polluting, renewable, and do not cause global warming. One viable alternative is biofuel which is fuel derived from...
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Module 3 SLP - microbial metabolic and environmental growth
Module 3 SLP - microbial metabolic and environmental growth
2 pages (500 words)
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... Factors Affecting Microbial Growth: Comparing Lactobacillus bulgaricus from Escherichia coli The maintenance of metabolic functionsto sustain microbial growth is greatly affected by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, nutrient availability, aeration, and the like (Hogg, 2005; Brooks et al., 2007). Since bacterial species are ubiquitous and exhibit different biochemical characteristics, it is not surprising to discover that each species possesses a different set of optimum growth requirements (Brooks et al., 2007; Richard et al., 2007). This paper aims to present the differences in environmental factors that affect the growth of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Escherichia coli. Temperature Di...
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Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemical Cycles
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Biogeochemical cycles A biogeochemical cycle is a cyclical pathway through which all nutrients stream in to the living components from the nonliving and then back to them. Bio means living, geo means rocks and soil and chemical means the involved processes. Out of the gaseous and sedimentary cycles, the two basic types, the former is global. The reason being its major nutrient pools are the atmosphere and the oceans, hence making it so. “The three most important gases for life are nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide. They are present in steady quantities of 78, 21 and 0.03 percents respectively, in atmosphere” (Smith, pp. 475). (Figure: Smith, pp.475) A nitrogen cycle consists of a gas phase an...
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Literature review of supplements and erogoeinc aids used by cycling athletes
Literature review of supplements and erogoeinc aids used by cycling athletes
16 pages (4000 words)
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... Literature review of supplements and erogoeinc aids used by cycling athletes Professional cycling is among the most physically demanding sports with a combination of extreme duration, intensity and frequency of the physical demand. Professional cyclists have approximately 100 race-days in a year with races ranging from 200 to 3000 and more kilometers on different terrains with different requirements for physical endurance, terrains like roads, mountains, cross road etc. (Jeukendrup et al. 2000). In a study conducted by White et al. 1984 the measured the physiological impact of 24 hours cycling race on a highly trained cycling athlete (23 years old, weighting 73 kilograms and 195 centimeters tall)....
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Case study - Physiological responses in cross-country sprint skiing; a study in regulation, control and homeostasis. (1500 words)
Case study - Physiological responses in cross-country sprint skiing; a study in regulation, control and homeostasis. (1500 words)
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Exercise Sprint skiing During the exercise, there are a lot of psychological and physiological processes that take place in the body. It is important that the body recover from the abnormal functioning. However, the process of recovery entails a lot of factors and changes. The complications that involve as a result of the body trying to recovery depend on the level of extremity of the exercise. At the same time the exercise is very essential to the body functioning. Therefore it should not be evaded. Changes in the muscles promote greater oxygen diffusion and, therefore, higher oxygen uptake One of the changes that promote greater oxygen diffusion is the contraction of the muscles takes a lot of oxy...
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Lactic acid and ethanol fermentation
Lactic acid and ethanol fermentation
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Number] Lactic acid and ethanol fermentation Introduction The word Fermentation is derived from Latin verb “fever” which means “to boil”. It is the process through which energy is derived from the oxidation of organic compounds such as carbohydrates, by using an electron accepter, usually an inner organic compound. In bio-chemistry, fermentation is an enzyme-catalyzed, a process of energy generation, in which organic compounds act both as donors as well as acceptors of electrons. The term is sometimes defined as the pathway in cells by which glucose / sugar molecules are broken down anaerobically. Historical perspective The historic uses of fermentation were mostly the creation of alcoholic...
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How might the anatomy and physiology of persons who were born and raised at very high altitudes be different from those who were born and raised in the lowlands and have only recently become acclimated to high elevations
How might the anatomy and physiology of persons who were born and raised at very high altitudes be different from those who were born and raised in the lowlands and have only recently become acclimated to high elevations
5 pages (1250 words)
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... in the anatomy and physiology of persons who moved from lower altitudes to become acclimated to higher altitudes Institution: Instructors name: Course name: Date due: Introduction A high altitude is 2400m above sea level and look at case studies of people such as the Andeans in South America, the Tibetans along Himalayan Mountains and Peru. They have over the years adapted to living in environments with low oxygen and cold. These people have adapted physiologically and anatomically to factors like reduction in heart diseases, changes in the body mechanism and coronary diseases. Though, they suffer from chronic mountain sickness and pulmonary hypertension. This paper will examine the effects of hig...
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Biology with citation
Biology with citation
2 pages (500 words)
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... I went to the top floor for taking my Mathematics paper, I was literally running. While running for a shorter distance, people usually feel pain and weakness in their legs. This is due to the build up of lactic acid, which is generally caused by the lack of oxygen in the leg muscles. When there is ample oxygen inside muscle cells, they are able to harness energy from glucose through glycolysis in which glucose is broken down into pyruvate. Again, this chemical substance is shuttled to aerobic pathways such as Kreb’s cycle and oxidative phosphorylation for more energy. However, when oxygen is present in a very less quantity inside the muscle cells, they temporarily convert pyruvate into a substance...
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Week 3 Discussion-Environmental
Week 3 Discussion-Environmental
2 pages (500 words)
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... – Food-borne Illness Botulism Order No. 308213 No. of pages: 2 6530 Botulism is a food borne disease caused by potent protein neurotoxins that is given off by ‘Clostridium Botulinum,’ which cause a lot of harm to the individual suffering from it. Its varied characteristics include vomiting, severe abdominal pain, disturbances to the motor system and other visual impairing difficulties. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classify botulism into four types: (1) food-borne; (2) infants; (3) wounds and (4) indeterminate. The Clostridium Botulinum is a spore forming rod like structures that are not only anaerobic but also Gram- positive. These rod - like spores are resistant to heat and a capa...
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Sports medicine/science
Sports medicine/science
10 pages (2500 words)
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... All sporting events require an athlete to adhere to certain training principles and guidelines. However, the training methods and requirements will vary. The training principles of a marathon runner will differ from that of a sprint runner. A knowledge of the body’s physiology and its application in the training regimen is thus very vital. In the past few decades, the disciplines of exercise science and exercise medicine have also evolved greatly to help sportspersons achieve their goal. SPORT AND EXERCISE MEDICINE “Sport and exercise medicine is a discipline, which draws upon basic and applied biomedical, and clinical science to ensure the prevention, diagnosis and management of sports and exerci...
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Training for Health, Fitness and Sport
Training for Health, Fitness and Sport
8 pages (2000 words)
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... Introduction Training is a consistent progression of exercises meant for improving the health status of an individual orincreasing performance in sports. There are two main goals of exercises carried out during trainings. These are the health related fitness trainings and the sport related fitness trainings. Health related fitness trainings are meant to prevent individuals from developing diseases associated with lack of physical activities. These trainings are also meant to enhance better growth and development of the body to facilitate a high level of functional capacity for the body organs. Health related fitness is very important because it helps in preventing diseases such as stroke, heart...
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Theory of Evolution and Evidence for Natural Selection
Theory of Evolution and Evidence for Natural Selection
8 pages (2000 words)
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... of Evolution and evidence for natural selection The term “evolution” in biology refers to the process through which plants, animals and otherliving organisms changed over time. It is the foundation for modern biological theories. By examining layers of rock and soil which are also known as “strata”, researchers have found fossils which are evidence of plants and animals which lived long ago but are not found anywhere in the world today. By examining these fossils closely, it has been discovered that the greater the age of the fossil, the more is it different from the living beings found today. More recent is a fossil, more is the resemblance to present day plants or animals. This is perhaps the...
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The Evolution of the Eukaryotic Cell
The Evolution of the Eukaryotic Cell
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1
... of the Eukaryotic Cell Introduction In the Proterozoic Era, 2.5 billion to 544 million years ago, the atmospheric level of oxygen increased to 15% due to oxygen producing cyanobacteria. The levels of oxygen in the atmosphere produced a fatal environment in which anaerobic organisms needed to evolve methods of coping with the presence of oxygen. These organisms evolved to be the organisms know today as eukaryotes. Direct filiation is the classical view of the evolution of eukaryotic organisms. This theory states that all organisms derived directly from a unique ancestral population by the accumulation of single step mutations, and that the same mutational mechanisms known to operate in the evolut...
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Ecosystems in South West Australia
Ecosystems in South West Australia
6 pages (1500 words)
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... in South West Australia al Affiliation Ecosystems in South West Australia Question One Projection about the prospect of climate change in South West Australian is a course of concern since the region has become 25% drier over the past few decades (Hughes, 2003). It is predicted that future changes in rainfall patterns and temperature over the next five decades will have significant impacts on the vegetation across the region. The climate change comes as a result of increase in greenhouse gas concentration that has already impacted negatively on the species and the ecosystem. The area is predicted to be drier and warmer as the 21st century progresses which will be characterized by drier seasons and...
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Physiology of Swimming
Physiology of Swimming
20 pages (5000 words)
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... Head: PHYSIOLOGY OF SWIMMING Physiology of Swimming [The [The of the Physiology of SwimmingBackground of Swimming Historical findings suggest that swimming has been acknowledged as regular physical exercise early as 2500 BC. In the earliest time documented, it transpires that swimming took place in Assyria, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Even so, in Rome, swimming was included in the curriculum of the elementary education of boys. It was compulsory for the boys and they had no option for exemption. Japan was also one of the first swimming countries to find out how to swim. Japan dates back to the first century BC, about the same time Rome did. There were many swimming events that took place in Japan before...
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Environmental effects on bacterial growth
Environmental effects on bacterial growth
3 pages (750 words)
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... Environmental effects on bacterial growth Introduction There are a limited number of living organisms in the world that can survive under almost all possible environmental conditions. Living organisms are limited by the ecological circumstances by which their habitats experience. The limitations are set by the interactions that exist between the organisms physiology and the environment within where they live. Each particular species has a set of conditions where they can survive, reproduce and grow. Temperature, oxygen, pressure and nutrition are some of the environmental elements that constrain the growth of the species with bacterial included in the list. The central question for the experiment was...
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Shock at the cellular level
Shock at the cellular level
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1
... at the cellular level Introduction Shock may be defined as inadequate delivery of substrates and oxygen to meet the metabolic needs of thetissues (Schwarz, eMedicine). It is the final common pathway for a number of potentially lethal clinical events. It leads to systemic hypoperfusion caused by either decreased cardiac output or decreased circulating volume (Mitchell, p.139). Shock may be categorized mainly into 3 categories: cardiogenic shock, hypovolemic shock and septic shock (Mitchell, p.139). Cardiogenic shock results from myocardial pump failure. It occurs in myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac tamponade and pulmonary embolism (Mitchell, p.139). Hypovolemic shock occurs...
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Identification of unknown
Identification of unknown
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Laboratory Report: Identification of Unknown Bacterial Culture Introduction The use of diagnostic bacteriology has made it possible to identify unknown bacterial cultures from clinical and environmental materials based on their metabolic or biochemical characteristics. Specific enzyme function and cellular respiration of a bacteria is key in the identification process. Before performing the experiment one should have adequate knowledge in staining methods, isolation techniques, microbial nutrition, biochemical characteristics and general characteristics of microorganisms to be able to identify the unknown bacteria. It is vital to differentiate the bacterial culture in order to make correct diagnosis ...
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1) Describe the physical and chemical requirements for microbial growth and: a. The industrial production of Yogurt. b. The role of microbes in the nitrogen cycle. c. The role of microbes in the spoilage of jam. Everyone does a. and b. and c. 2) P
1) Describe the physical and chemical requirements for microbial growth and: a. The industrial production of Yogurt. b. The role of microbes in the nitrogen cycle. c. The role of microbes in the spoilage of jam. Everyone does a. and b. and c. 2) P
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Microbiology Number Department Physical and Chemical Requirements for Microbial Growth Microbial growth basically refers to a general increase in the number of microbial cells thus forming populations. For microbes to grow there are certain physical and chemical requirements that should essentially be in place. Chemical requirements for microbial growth include water and other mineral elements, gases and growth factors. Mineral elements include carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous, oxygen, and trace elements. Carbon is the main source of energy in microbes and can be obtained from carbohydrates, fats, lipids, or proteins (Chaudhary, 2008, p. 345). Chemoautotrophs and photoautotrophs both obtain...
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Pick up a topic from my PDF
Pick up a topic from my PDF
8 pages (2000 words)
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... Biology Essay 30 October Final Examination The Sequence of Appearance and Diversity of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Protists Kingdom Protista contains members with unicellular reproductive makeup whose organelles are bound by a nuclear membrane. It includes members exhibiting variations in body forms, for example, some are unicellular while others are multicellular. Protists have chloroplasts and can manufacture food through the process of photosynthesis. All protists have mitochondria and can carry out respiration (breakdown of glucose to yield energy). It is believed that the first cellular life forms were anaerobic heterotrophs because they lacked fully functional mitochondria. For example,...
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Cellular Microbiology
Cellular Microbiology
8 pages (2000 words)
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... and Evolution of Photosynthesis The very existence of human life fully depends upon photosynthesis, which is a significant biochemical process of energy production in plants with the help of chloroplasts, their most essential cell organelle containing chlorophyll, the green pigment essential for capturing sunlight. The importance of photosynthesis is deep seated in our lives with implications in energy production, agriculture, environmental control and health issues. The novel mechanism of conversion of light energy to chemical energy not only affects our life but also the life of the apparently most insignificant forms of organisms, like the coral animal that takes the help of this biochemical...
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Causes Of Bent Grass And Effect Of Soil Compaction On Turf Recovery
Causes Of Bent Grass And Effect Of Soil Compaction On Turf Recovery
11 pages (2750 words)
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... OF BENT GRASS AND EFFECT OF SOIL COMPACTION ON TURF RECOVERY Parklands, college campuses, athletic fields, and farms have an interest in controlling the damage to turfgrasses from foot traffic. The consequences of heavy traffic to grasses, as well as soil are quantified. Measurements and variables are described that influence the height potential of turfgrass, as well as its ability to recover from the damage induced by foot traffic. Analyses were conducted to determine the greatest height attainment by grass transections, and the correlation towards soil conditions; particularly soil compaction. While there is abundant research evidence that soil compaction due to foot traffic impedes grass growth...
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Ocean Life and the Impact Of Humans. An overview of the Gulf of Mexico
Ocean Life and the Impact Of Humans. An overview of the Gulf of Mexico
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Oceans are important aquatic habitats for both marine fauna and flora. The wide diversity of life in these crucial habitats plays important environmental and economic roles. Marine life is also a major component of various natural processes including hydrological and carbon cycles that play a crucial role in maintaining life in the planet. However, due to the crucial economic importance of aquatic resources, there has been an upsurge of human activities including tourism, mining, fishing and other industries in these habitats. These human activities have regrettably diminished ocean life through unsustainable practices such as overexploitation of the resources and introduction of pollutants. This...
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Fermentation Kinetics of Different Sugars
Fermentation Kinetics of Different Sugars
10 pages (2500 words)
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... Kinetics of Different Sugars Abstract The process of fermentation has been in used for centuries. As the importance of fermentation increases day by day in many industries one must understand the factors which may increase or decrease the rate of the process. As fermentation uses many molecules mostly carbohydrates as the principal source, this paper investigates the role of different carbohydrates namely glucose, sucrose, maltose and lactose on the rate of fermentation. Furthermore the paper explores the use of cofactor in different process highlighting the role of magnesium ion in glycolysis which is believed to be the precursor process to fermentation. The experiment thus also includes the effect...
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Exam 2
Exam 2
4 pages (1000 words)
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... A) Criticism and the revision of theories Criticism is always influenced by competitors who are willing to be more prominent than you are as a result they must scrutinize any activity that is presented by you. As this will be the first step of ruining your fame and your views to certain area. For instance as seen from the various researches done on evolution of cells by different scientists each research is trying to elaborate himself by really looking in the weakness of the opponent as the weakness from you will be used as the improvement of the other. However, with criticism many theories can be revised in order to clearly give out the exact nature. Through criticism, scientists are able to conduct...
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Chemistry and the Environment
Chemistry and the Environment
4 pages (1000 words)
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... Chemistry and the Environment Describe the general properties of the atmosphere known as troposphere, stratosphereand the ionosphere. Describe the composition of unpolluted air at sea level.   The unpolluted air or atmosphere at sea level is chiefly made of gases kept in place by the effect of Earth’s gravity at an average temperature of about 14 C. Nitrogen and oxygen predominantly comprise the Earth’s atmosphere at approximately 78.1% and 20.9% respectively while there exists trace amounts of certain elements as argon, water vapor, and carbon dioxide to account for the remaining 1%. Negligible quantities of dust, volcanic ash, and other particulates in solid form are also present in the atmosphere ...
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Microbiology College Essay
Microbiology College Essay
4 pages (1000 words)
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... If ATP is such an important energy source for prokaryotic cells, why do you think it is not routinely added to the growth medium for theseorganisms (10 pts) Hint: explanation and purposes of metabolism The Gram positive cell wall is made up of peptidoglycan and on its surface the Teichoic acids protrude out. Teichoic acids give the Gram positive cell wall an overall negative charge due to the presence of phosphodiester bonds between Teichoic acid monomers. As the lipopolysaccharides are highly charged, the Gram negative cell wall has an overall negative charge. The net charge on ATP molecule is also negative so it will not be absorbed in the cytoplasm (Pelczar, Chan and Krieg, 1986). 2. A populat...
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The effects of exercise benefits
The effects of exercise benefits
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Physical, Psychological and Social Benefits of Exercise Diseases are constantly increasing in number around the world so that people are becoming more aware and active in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. As it has been proven for centuries, prevention is better than cure. This is the idea of most people especially those who are at high risk of having serious diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoporosis and other problems like obesity, depression and anxiety. Nowadays, it is not only the people at risk of such circumstances who are getting more indulged in physical exercises but also those who are physically healthy. This is so because exercise does not just improve...
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The safety and efficacy of chronic Assault supplementation
The safety and efficacy of chronic Assault supplementation
52 pages (13000 words)
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... S SPORTS ACADEMY AN INVESTIGATION TO DETERMINE THE SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF CHRONIC ASSAULT SUPPLEMENTATION A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE FACULTY in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of MASTERS OF SPORTS SCIENCE By GEFF PURDY Daphne, AL 2012 AN INVESTIGATION TO DETERMINE THE SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF CHRONIC ASSAULT SUPPLEMENTATION A THESIS APPROVED FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF SPORTS FITNESS & HEALTH BY _________________________ Dr. Jordan Moon, Chair Dr. Enrico Esposito ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to show my sincerest appreciation for all your guidance and support. Thesis Committee Chair and Advisor: Dr. Jordan Moon Thesis Committee Member: Dr. Enrico Esposito Human Performance Lab:...
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Can Alkaline Diets Prevent Cancer
Can Alkaline Diets Prevent Cancer
6 pages (1500 words)
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... Can Alkaline Diet Treat Cancer The human body comprises mainly of what an individual consumes. The foods we eat determinethe nature of our health and wellness. Nowadays, there are widespread cases of degenerative diseases that are mainly attributed to the environmental events during the past two centuries. In the past 20 centuries before industrial revolution, there were no extensive cases of cancer reported in the traditional communities. Today, cancer is the most fatal terminal disease that that has continued to give medical researchers sleepless nights. The effects of cancer in the human body dishearten and make one view life as useless. Amid the rising cases of cancer, the main question is; wha...
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Bio
Bio
2 pages (500 words)
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... Enzyme reactions Question i. An enzyme is a biological catalysts that has a functionality of increasing bodily reaction rates. ii. Roles of enzymes Speeding Up rates of reaction iii. An Active site is part of the enzyme that that sticks to a substrate during the reaction process. iv. A substrate is a compound in the cells that react chemically v. Factors affecting enzyme reaction are; Enzyme concentration Substrate concentration Temperature vi. Free energy refers to the energy available and has ability to do work i.e. the potential energy vii. Entropy refers to the measure of degree of randomness in a biological system. viii. Kinetic energy is a form of energy and is the energy of movement while po...
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How Organisms Cope With Biotic Environmental Factors
How Organisms Cope With Biotic Environmental Factors
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Using examples from the major groups of life describe how organisms cope with biotic environmental factors. Biotic factors encompass diverse life forms such as prokaryotes involving bacteria; eukaryotes like protists, fungi, plants and animals. These diverse forms of life evolved from the abiotic or non-living components, with gradual change in the atmospheric conditions and enhanced concentration of the oxygen from ~ 5 X 10-9 to the current, 21% of all the atmospheric gases. This high percentage is attributed to the process of photosynthesis, which utilizes the CO2, solar energy water and chlorophyll, an essential component for the respiration of eukaryotes. Interaction of biotic and abiotic compo...
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Enterobacter Aerogenes
Enterobacter Aerogenes
8 pages (2000 words)
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... AEROGENES Introduction: The modern challenge that most of the medical practitioners all over the world face today is, not so much, the identification of new microorganisms and the diseases caused by them, as the difficulty experienced in treating some of the already very familiar diseases which have suddenly become very stubborn to treatment with commonly used antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. This is mainly due to the phenomenon of drug-resistance which some of the microorganisms manage to develop ingeniously to protect themselves and their progeny from destruction by modern drugs. So a real war of wits has been going on between these little pathogens and the mighty medical science. In the ...
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Carbohydrate Diets
Carbohydrate Diets
50 pages (12500 words)
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... effect of carbohydrate on fatigue, and the effect of high and low glycemic index of food 3 Introduction: 4 Review of Literature: 5Research Methodology: 32 Subjects & Method: 32 Study design: 33 Equipments used: 34 Study Objective: 34 Procedure for Statistical analysis 36 Results 38 Two -Way ANOVA test: 44 Discussion: 47 Limitations of Study 51 Conclusions and Recommendations: 52 Appendix-1 : Par-Q 55 References 57 Abstract: The study in trying to identify the effect of carbohydrates on fatigue, and the effect of high and low glycemic index of food evaluated 15 male subjects between 18-25 years while performing the 7 trials of shuttle runs. The study conducted a qualit...
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Inluence of Sport Science disciplines on Basketball
Inluence of Sport Science disciplines on Basketball
22 pages (5500 words)
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... of Sport Science Disciplines on Basketball Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 Introduction 3 Section Biomechanical Factors of the Sport 5 Introduction 5 Literature Review 5 Conclusion 10 Section 2: Physiological Factors of the Sport 12 Introduction 12 Literature Review 12 Conclusion 16 Section 3: Psychological factors of the sport 18 Introduction 18 Literature Review 18 Conclusion 22 Summary 23 References 25 Bibliography 35 Introduction Sport Science is a discipline of study that focuses on the development of knowledge related to the understanding of how a body reacts during exercise. The different sectors of the sports sciences incorporate various factors like physiology, biomechanics and psychol...
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Breathlessness
Breathlessness
8 pages (2000 words)
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... Analysis: Conduct a Concept Analysis on Breathlessness The aim of nursing science is to develop theories to describe, explain, and understandthe nature of the phenomena, and anticipate the occurrence of phenomena, events, and situations related directly or indirectly to nursing care. Theory development can be accomplished by inductive or deductive processes or by a combination of both. The content of a theory comes from other theories, practice, or research or a combination of two or more of these sources (Nesbit, J.C. and Adesope, O.O., 2006, p. 444). Using other theories as a source of generating a theory involves a deductive process, whereas using practice experience or research findings for...
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Clinical Case Study- Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic Syndrome
Clinical Case Study- Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemic Syndrome
12 pages (3000 words)
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... Hyperosomar Hyperglycaemia Syndrome Introduction Hyperosomar Hyperglycaemia Syndrome is a condition in which a patient’s blood-glucose level is very high, but ketones are not present in the patient’s urine or blood (The Healthy Living Magazine, 2013). This essay investigates Mrs. L and provides the clinical manifestations and patient management and interventions that were applied while taking care of her in the Emergency Department. Mrs. L, a fifty-year old female was brought to the Hospital’s Emergency Department in an ambulance, after she had fallen down while in her bathroom. She was accompanied by her daughter. Mrs. L had a three-day history of confusion, lethargy and drowsiness. She complained...
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Engineering - Anaerobic Digestion
Engineering - Anaerobic Digestion
8 pages (2000 words)
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... ANAEROBIC DIGESTION Lecturer: Address: Anaerobic Digestion Introduction Energy is a requirement for every living thing. It can be found in many forms, some in their primary state and others are converted into secondary resources for easier use. Fuel happens to be one of the most popular forms of energy in the world for it is used for numerous applications. Fuel itself can be generated from numerous resources, some renewable such as the sun and others scarce such as naturally occurring oil. Energy from waste is one of the revolutions that is currently going on as the world attempts to Go Green and counter the effects of overdependence on fossil fuels, which has choked the atmosphere. Leading in the...
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Respiration & Circulation
Respiration & Circulation
5 pages (1250 words)
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... and circulation Introduction Respiration and circulation are two different aspects, but their functionality involves the provision of oxygen and elimination of carbon dioxide in the body. During respiration, energy is released by oxygen from food. The process also involves removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) as a by-product. Circulation is movement of blood through the blood vessels in the body to and from the heart. Both components are related in that CO2 is a waste product that has to be eliminated from the body through the process of respiration. Other waste products such as dead blood cells are absorbed to the blood spleen during blood circulation. There are different parts of circulation and...
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Cellular respiration and fermentation
Cellular respiration and fermentation
5 pages (1250 words)
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... Respiration and Fermentation Table of Contents Abstract 2 Paper Proper 2 Introduction 2 Materials and Methods 2 Results 4 Conclusions 4 References 8 Abstract The two-part experiment involved tracking fermentation and respiration processes making use of carbon dioxide markers in gas height and in the production of carbonic acid respectively (ASPB Foundation n.d.; Nuffield Foundation 2013; The Regents of the University of California 2011).. Paper Proper Introduction The goal of the experiment is to investigate respiration and fermentation reactions. Studying fermentation and respiration as done in this experiment has implications for industry, as fermentation reactions, for one, impact the way we...
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Nacl and cellular respiration
Nacl and cellular respiration
1 pages (250 words)
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... Why sodium chloride (NaCl) has no effect on cellular respiration Cellular respiration is the process by which food molecules like glucose are being oxidized to produce carbon dioxide and molecules of water. The energy released during the breakdown process is in the form of ATP, which is used in cellular activities. The process occurs in all organisms (Meldrum 22). C6H12O6 + 6O2 + 6H2O → 12H2O + 6 CO2 NaCl has no effect on the process of cellular respiration because of the following reasons; NaCl has no effect on temperature availability. Respiration rate is high in warm temperatures than in cold environment regardless of salt availability. This is because the effect of temperature is controlled by t...
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Human Systems - Respiration
Human Systems - Respiration
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1
... Systems – Respiration The human body is an intricate combination of an array of chemicals, compounds and various components which work simultaneously and co-operatively with each other so as to ensure health and survival of the being. The basic structural and functional units of a living being are the cells, which are arranged in groups called tissues. Groups of tissues combined form organs, and organs working towards a specific purpose together are called a system. One of the most important systems of the human body is the Respiratory System. The respiratory system is the biological system of any organism that engages in gaseous exchange. It provides the energy needed by cells of the body. The foll...
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Cellular Respiration and Fermentation
Cellular Respiration and Fermentation
3 pages (750 words)
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... of Paper: Cellular Respiration and Fermentation Jason Due 15 October Cellular Respiration and Fermentation Cellular respiration usually allows living organisms to use energy stored in the chemical bonds of glucose (C6H12O6). A cell always uses adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to supply their energy needs and so cellular respiration is a process in which energy in the glucose is transferred to ATP (Campebell 158). (al) During respiration glucose is oxidized releasing energy and oxygen is reduced to form water. The carbon atom of the sugar molecule is released as CO2. The complete breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide and water requires two major steps: glycolysis and aerobic respiration (Campebell 14...
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