The Mexican narcotrafficking problem - Case Study Example

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Deployment of military in the streets proved to be a not suitable approach to tackle the NTO problem in Mexico as what the experience of Mexico’s past president would tell. Instead of curbing the drug problem, he instead unleashed a war between NTO and military and NTOs…
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The Mexican narcotrafficking problem
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Download file to see previous pages The cartel has grown so big that Sinaloa’s infamous leader Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has assumed a mythical proportion as an outlaw indicating that government’s approach to tackle the cartel and drug issue is not suitable.
To make any strategy and state intervention initiative effective, the state needs to understand first how NTO’s became so large and wealthy and to understand their strategies how they develop their markets and fight their competitors. Knee jerk approach such as former president Enrique Calderon’s military solution is not suitable to solve the issue. In understanding the business models of NTO, they also need to identify its weaknesses and vulnerabilities. One of which was already identify which it cannot operate without the huge income from trafficking which was needed to fund arms procurement and increased personnel numbers. Having this understanding of how NTOs and cartels work and their business model, the state can appropriately formulate their own strategy that is effective and durable. This understanding will also allow them to act preemptively in the future making it more suitable to tackle Mexico’s drug, cartel and violence problem. Suitable counter-NTO strategies should be acceptable to all stakeholders and it is imperative that the state has the appropriate capabilities.
The desired approach must be suitable to the problem with the direct effect of curbing if not stopping NTOs. Present reality indicates that the previous approach in solving the NTO problem is not suitable.
Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has only limited years in tenure to deliver visible results in tackling the NTO and violence problem in Mexico if he is to be reelected. His adviser already knows that military solution alone will not solve the problem. The paper also mentioned the law enforcement ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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